Acute myloid leukemia

Acute myloid leukemia: Description, Causes and Risk Factors: Abbreviation: AML. Alternative Names: Acute myelocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, myeloid leukemia. Acute myloid leukemia is a type of cancer that starts in cells that normally develop into different types of blood cells. Most cases of AML develop from cells that would turn into white blood cells (nonlymphocyte white blood cells). Acute myloid leukemia starts in the bone marrow of the bones where new blood cells are made then moves quickly into the blood. From the blood AML can spread to other parts of the body including the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, the brain and spinal cord, and testes. Unlike many other types of cancer, there is no standard "staging" system for Acute myloid leukemia. Instead, the disease is described as "untreated" or "in remission" or "recurrent." Men are more frequently diagnosed with AML than women. Acute myeloid leukemia is uncommon in children with most cases diagnosed after the age of 50. Incidence rates are highest in non-Hispanic whites. acute myloid leukemia Acute myloid leukemia is an acquired disease, not a genetic or contagious one. Acute myloid leukemia is caused by damage to the DNA of developing cells in the bone marrow and risk factors include: Tobacco smoking.
  • Long term exposure to high levels of benzene.
  • Although AML is not inherited, genetic factors may play a role in its development. Some congenital disorders such as Down's syndrome, Bloom's syndrome and Fanconi's anaemia may increase the chance of getting AML.
  • Treatment with certain chemotherapy drugs.
  • High-dose radiation exposure.
  • Having a history of a blood disorder such as myelodysplastic syndrome.
  • Having had treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
Symptoms: Fever.
  • Chronic fatigue.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Weight loss.
  • Lack of appetite.
  • Bone or joint pain.
  • Swelling in the abdomen.
  • Lumps or rashes on the skin.
  • Swollen and bleeding gums.
Diagnosis: Acute myloid leukemia is diagnosed by examining samples of your blood and bone marrow, which include CBC. Most people with AML have a low red cell count, low hemoglobinlevel, and a low platelet count. Bone Marrow Examination: Diagnosis of AML isconfirmed by the presence of an excessive number of blast cells inthe bone marrow. Blood and bone marrow cellsare examined further using special laboratory tests. These includeimmunophenotyping and cytogenetic tests.These tests provide more information about the exact type ofdisease you have. Other Tests: Kidney function tests.
  • Liver function tests.
  • Coagulation tests.
Imaging Tests: Chest x-ray.
  • Electrocardiogram.
Treatment: It is recommended that those diagnosed with AML seek treatment as soon after diagnosis as possible. Because there is no cure for leukemia or any other type of cancer, emphasis is instead placed on bringing about remission, in which there is no evidence of cell overproduction in the marrow. Standard treatments for acute myeloid leukemia include chemotherapy or chemotherapy radiation. Another treatment option can be stem cell transplant, a method of chemotherapy where blood-forming cells are destroyed and replaced by stem cells of the patient or donor through an infusion. Disclaimer:The above information is just informative purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

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