Allergic alveolitis


Allergic alveolitis

Description, Causes and Risk Factors:

The lungs are filled with millions of tiny sacs called alveoli that supply new blood with fresh oxygen and remove carbon dioxide from old blood. In the case of alveolitis, the sacs are inflamed and stop expanding and contracting properly. Over time, inflammation can leave alveoli permanently scarred and completely unable to function. There are many different known causes of alveolitis, including severe viral infections, frequent respiratory illnesses, radiation therapy, and autoimmune disorders. Alveoli can also be damaged when a person breathes in harmful irritants, such as asbestos debris, silica dust, or metal shavings.

allergic alveolitis

Allergic alveolitis, while not strictly a zoonotic disease (because it is not really an infection), is still an issue for concern. It is also known by a number of other monikers - hypersensitivity pneumonitis, parakeet dander pneumoconiosis and pigeon lung disease. In people with pet or breeding birds this particular alveolitis is caused by contact with feather dander, dust and feces of birds. The disease itself can be cryptic: clinical signs can occur within two years but may take as many as 10-20 years of continuous exposure. Once the disease process is set into motion it may occur in acute, subacute or chronic forms.

It is important to seek early diagnosis and treatment of allergic alveolitis at the first signs of lung disease to prevent major complications such as permanent scarring or sudden respiratory failure. Treatment for alveolitis may involve taking medications, making healthy lifestyle changes, or undergoing surgery.

Reversal of the subacute form of the disorder is possible, again, if exposure is stopped. If it iscontinues a chronic, non-reversible type occurs in which progressively difficult breathing (dyspnea), dry cough and weight loss are the key signs. This is potentially serious, and can bemistaken for a bad cold or influenza virus. With chronic alveolitis permanent lung problemsmay develop - including a serious illness called pulmonary fibrosis, which reduces the lungs'ability to take in air properly.

Symptoms:

Symptoms may include:

    Coughing.

  • Dyspnea.

  • Chills.

  • High fever.

  • Dry cough.

  • Progressive breathing difficulty.

Diagnosis:

A doctor can usually diagnose alveolitis in the early stages by taking imaging scans of the lungs. X-rays and computerized tomography scans (CT-scans) can reveal the extent of inflammation and scarring in alveoli tissue. In addition to confirming the presence of the disorder, the doctor typically performs physical tests to see how well the lungs are working. The stage of disease and the severity of breathing problems help to determine the appropriate course of treatment.

Treatment:

The severe nature of this disease can be reduced by taking some fairly simple precautions:Wearing face masks and other protective gear while cleaning cages, cleaning cages daily, bathingpet birds frequently (which they will enjoy), avoiding overcrowding of birds and cages in theaviary (which is better for the birds as well) and installing air filtration systems which containmultiple and hepa filters.

NOTE: The above information is educational purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Cart Preview

Regular Bedtime Linked to Better Heart Health and Metabolism

Regular Bedtime Linked to Better Heart Health and Metabolism

According to a recent study, completed by the scientists from the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, USA, regular bedtime is important for heart health and metabolism. A team of scientists examined the sleeping patterns of approximately 2,000 adults aged...

Regular Walking May Reduce Stroke Severity

Regular Walking May Reduce Stroke Severity

A new study, conducted by the scientists from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, finds that light and moderate physical activity, for example walking and swimming, may help reduce the stroke severity. The study included approximately data from 1,000 individuals...

[WpProQuiz 1]

Featured Products

The 5 Best Accessories for Sports Fans

It is very entertaining to be a sport fan. There is a big variety of sport games that are extremely interesting to follow. Moreover, it is always fun to anticipate the score and watch the enthusiasm live. One of the benefits of being sports fan is using different...

read more

Exercise May Serve as an Antidepressant

A new study of nearly 18,000 participants found that those with high fitness at middle age were significantly less likely to die from heart disease in later life, even if they were diagnosed with depression. Doctor's Tips: How to Stay Fit While Treating Depression Dr....

read more

Fitness: Warm Ups Can Chill Out the Perfomance

The warm ups are supposed to increase body temperature and blood flow so the muscles and surrounding joints become more responsive and prepared for physical activity. Although there’s a neurological element to warm-ups, most research focuses on the physiological...

read more