Biliuria

Biliuria: Description, Cuases and Risk Factors:

Biliuria - the presence of various bile salts, or bile, in the urine.

Alternative Names: Choleuria, choluria.

ICD-9-CM: 791.4.

Bile salt is a chemical produced in the liver and stored in the gallbladder. It aids in the digestion of fats and helps in the elimination of toxins from the body. When insufficient bile salts are present in the body, disease can occur as a result of the toxic buildup.

Bile is secreted into the digestive tract from the gallbladder to help digestion. Here, bile salts aid in the absorption of certain food components, such as fats, and prevent the absorption of others, such as toxins. Further, bile salts are made up of sodium salts of different acids manufactured in the liver and derived from cholesterol. They help emulsify fats and contribute to their absorption in the intestines.

Recent research indicates that taking bile salts orally as a supplement can help prevent the buildup of toxins in patients with abnormal bile production or who have had gallbladders removed.Biliuria

Bile salts (Biliuria) are steroid metabolites of cholesterol. Cholic acid and choledeoxycholic acid are major products. All of the bile salts excreted from the liver cells are conjugated with either glycine or taurine. Partial deconjugation occurs in the bowel due to action of bacterial enzymes. Bacterial enzymes also result in the production of secondary bile salts.

Bile salts (Biliuria) are partially absorbed in the proximal small intestine, where most food is absorbed. There is active reabsorption of most bile salts in the terminal ileum. The vast majority of excreted bile salt is reabsorbed and returns to the liver in the portal vein, where it is re-excreted (enterohepatic circulation). Recirculation has been estimated to occur about 6 times a day.

Sometimes after undergoing gall bladder surgery, patients suffer from bile salt diarrhea. However, only about five percent of individuals suffer from bile salt diarrhea after gall bladder surgery.

The exact risk factors, responsible for the development of bile salt diarrhea (Biliuria) after surgery, are not yet known. Bile salt diarrhea can be quite embarrassing. People suffering from this ailment are forced to rush to the bathroom always after a meal. This makes bile salt diarrhea patients reluctant to have a meal away from their home.

Symptoms of Biliuria:

Symptoms of bile salt diarrhea (Biliuria) might vary from person to person. The common symptoms are water diarrhea immediately after eating.

Treatment Options of Biliuria:

In case of severe diarrhea, patients are usually prescribed medicines, known as cholestyramine, which help to bind the bile salts that the small intestine fails to absorb. Regular consumption of calcium citrate supplements are known to cure bile salt diarrhea. Eating a handful of nuts every day can also reduce the severity of the diarrhea.

DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

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