Cutaneous vasculitis

Cutaneous vasculitis: Description, Causes and Risk Factors: Abbreviation: CV. Cutaneous vasculitisCutaneous vasculitis comprises a wide spectrum of diseases that involve predominantly the blood vessels and surrounding tissues of the skin. All of them share the presence of vascular inflammation and blood vessel damage with inflammation of the small blood vessels including arterioles, capillaries and post-capillary venules of the skin. However, a variable grade of visceral involvement and vascular inflammation involving the medium-sized arteries is often observed. It particularly affects small and medium-sized blood vessels, such as the arterioles, capillaries and venules. Arterioles are small arteries or blood vessels carrying oxygenated blood from the heart to other parts of the body. Capillaries are very tiny blood vessels that connect the veins to the arteries. Venules are small veins that are mostly responsible in transporting un-oxygenated blood towards the heart. Cutaneous vasculitis is divided into three kinds: acute, subacute and chronic. Common causes include serum sickness, infections (e.g., hepatitis C), cancers, rheumatologic or other autoimmune disorders, and hypersensitivity to drugs. Vessel inflammation often results from immune complex deposition, but other pathogenetic mechanisms may be involved. Predominantly cutaneous vasculitis is a leukocytoclastic vasculitis, so-called because inflammation disrupts leukocytes, resulting in deposition of nuclear debris (leukocytoclasis) in the vessel wall. The incidence of cutaneous vasculitis ranges from 15.4 to 29.7 cases per million per year. The condition affects all ages, slightly less in male than female patients, and adults more often than children, with 90% of the latter having Henoch-Sch

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