Divers palsy

Decompression Sickness (Diver's palsy) Description, Causes and Risk Factors: Alternative Name: Caisson disease and decompression disease. Abbreviation: DCS. ICD-9-CM: 993.3. A symptom complex caused by the escape from solution in the body fluids of nitrogen bubbles absorbed originally at high atmospheric pressure, as a result of abrupt reduction in atmospheric pressure (either rapid ascent to high altitude or return from a compressed-air environment); it is characterized by headache, pain in the arms, legs, joints, and epigastrium, itching of the skin, vertigo, dyspnea, coughing, choking, vomiting, weakness and sometimes paralysis, and severe peripheral circulatory collapse; bone infarcts can occur from bubbles in nutrient vessels leading to long-term consequences. Decompression Sickness is an illness that can affect divers or other people such as miners who are in a situation that involves pressure rapidly decreasing around the body. It occurs most commonly in scuba or deepsea divers, although it also can occur during high altitude or unpressurized air travel. However, decompression sickness is rare in pressurized aircraft, such as those used for commercial flights. Types: Type I: Cutaneous Decompression Sickness: This is when the nitrogen bubbles come out of solution in skin capillaries. This normally results in a red rash, often on the shoulders and chest. Joint and Limb Pain Decompression Sickness: This type is characterized by aching in the joints. It is not known exactly what causes the pain as bubbles in the joint would not have this effect. The common theory is that it is caused by the bubbles aggravating bone marrow, tendons, and joints. The pain can be in one place or it can move around the joint. It is unusual for bisymmetrical symptoms to occur. Type II: Pulmonary Decompression Sickness: This is a rare form of Decompression Sickness that occurs when bubbles form in lung capillaries. Fortunately, the majority of the time bubbles dissolve naturally through the lungs. However, it is possible for them to interrupt blood flow to the lungs which can lead to serious and life-threatening respiratory and heart problems. Neurological Decompression Sickness: When nitrogen bubbles affect the nervous system they can cause problems throughout the body. This type of Decompression Sickness normally shows as tingling, numbness, respiratory problems, and unconsciousness. Symptoms can spread quickly and if left untreated can lead to paralysis or even death. Cerebral Decompression Sickness: It is possible for bubbles that make their way into the arterial blood stream to move to the brain and to cause an arterial gas embolism. This is extremely dangerous and can be identified by symptoms such as blurred vision, headaches, confusion, and unconsciousness. Symptoms:Decompression Sickness Symptoms of decpmression include extreme fatigue, numbness, joint and limb pain, heart problems, respiratory problems, dizziness, vertigo, confusion and headaches. Your diving history and symptoms are key factors in diagnosing decompression sickness. Blood tests and joint X-rays usually do not show any signs of the problem, although doctors send your for these if the diagnosis is not clear. Treatment: Emergency treatment for decompression sickness involves maintaining blood pressure and administering oxygen. Fluids also may be given. The key to treatment is the use of a hyperbaric oxygen chamber, which is a high-pressure chamber in which the patient receives 100% oxygen. This treatment reverses the pressure changes that allowed gas bubbles to form and it drives nitrogen back into its liquid form so that it can be cleared more gradually over a period of hours. It is not recommended that divers with decompression sickness attempt to treat themselves with deep diving. People with lung-related symptoms, skin rashes or neurological symptoms of decompression sickness also should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen. DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.  

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Cart Preview

Cheap Drugs May Help Prevent Dementia after a Stroke

Cheap Drugs May Help Prevent Dementia after a Stroke

A new research from the University of Edinburgh, UK, suggests that cheap cilostazol tablets may reduce damage to arteries, which lead to blood clots, resulting in strokes and cognitive decline. The researchers plan to assess the medications’ ability to cut the risk of...

Flavonoids in Fruits and Vegetables May Preserve Lung Function

Flavonoids in Fruits and Vegetables May Preserve Lung Function

A new study from the US discovers that flavonoids, natural compounds found in fruits and vegetables, may help preserve the lung function, which tends to decline with age. For the study, a team of researchers looked at data from 463 adults from Norway and England whose...

Quiz about this article

Please answer on few questions to make our service more useful

Featured Products

Spring is Here: Top 6 Outdoor Sports

Good weather is the best reason to do outdoor sports, which will help not only lose weight, but also will strengthen health. Bicycle The sun dries out the local paths, so you can safely sit on your favorite bike and confidently twist the pedals, where the eyes look....

read more

First Aid in Case of Injuries for Sport and Exercise

First aid for injuries consists of simple rules that need to be clearly implemented. If this is a closed injury, you need to immobilize the injured limb, otherwise the person may lose consciousness from a painful shock. If you need to get to the emergency room...

read more