Garres Disease

Garre's Disease: Description, Causes and Risk Factors: Fusiform thickening or increased density of bones, of unknown cause; it has been considered a form of chronic nonsuppurative osteomyelitis. Alternative Names: Condensing osteitis or sclerosing osteitis. Garre's Disease ICD-9-CM: 730.1. A rare, benign rheumatologic disorder or syndrome characterized by hyperostosis and soft tissue ossification between the clavicles and the anterior part of the upper ribs. It is often associated with the dermatologic disorder palmoplantar pustulosis. Garre's disease sclerosing osteomyelitis is a specific type of chronic osteomyelitis that mainly affects children and young adults. This disease entity is well-described in dental literature and is commonly associated with an odontogenic infection resulting from dental caries. Condensing osteitis is a reaction to infection. Bacterial causes are the most common and may arise from a variety of sources. There are many conditions, such as a fracture, which may lead to this disease. In addition, depending upon the duration, there are both subacute and chronic forms of the disease. It differs from other periapical inflammatory diseases in that there is a bone production rather than bone destruction. The result is a radiopaque lesion. This sclerotic reaction is apparently brought about by good patient resistance coupled with a low degree of virulence of the offending bacteria. It is more commonly seen in the young and seems to show special predilection for the periapical region of lower molars. The associated tooth is carious or contains a large restoration. Whether or not the pulp is irreversibly diseased is not known. Current level of knowledge suggests that the pulp is irreversibly inflamed. Uncommonly, condensing osteitis occurs as a reaction to periodontal infection rather than dental infection. Treatment: Treatment: General protocol is to treat only those cases which are symptomatic. This is done by endodontic therapy or extraction. In those cases which are asymptomatic in which there is no obvious caries in the associated tooth, we follow them with periodic x-ray examination. DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.  

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