Glomerulosclerosis

Glomerulosclerosis: Description, Causes and Risk Factors: GlomerulosclerosisHyaline deposits or scarring within the renal glomeruli, a degenerative process occurring in association with renal arteriosclerosis or diabetes. Alternative Name: Glomerular sclerosis. ICD-9-CM: 250.4. Glomerulosclerosis is scarring of the glomeruli. In several sclerotic conditions, a systemic disease like lupus or diabetes is responsible. Glomerulosclerosis is caused by the activation of glomerular cells to produce scar material. This may be stimulated by molecules called growth factors, which may be made by glomerular cells themselves or may be brought to the glomerulus by the circulating blood that enters the glomerular filter. Glomerulosclerosis can develop in children and adults and may result from different types of kidney conditions. One kind of glomerulosclerosis frequently encountered is caused by diabetes. Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), another chronic kidney condition, may be caused by infection or drug use; it may occur in patients with AIDS. However, most cases of FSGS are of unknown cause. Symptoms: Early stages of glomerulosclerosis may not produce any symptoms but the most important warning sign is proteinuria. Other symptoms include Diagnosis: There are no strong clues to the diagnosis on physical examination, other than evidence of edema and elevated blood pressure. Signs of kidney renal failure and associated fluid overload may develop as the illness gets worse. Treatment Options: Treatments for glomerulosclerosis depend on what caused the scarring of the glomeruli. This is determined by renal biopsy. Immunosuppressants, drugs that suppress the immune system, stop proteinuria in some patients, but once the treatments have ended proteinuria will continue In general, treatments may include: Low fat diet.
  • Salt-free diet.
  • Low or moderate protein diet (1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight per day).
  • Fluid restriction.
  • Powerful anti-inflammatory medicines to reduce the immune response.
  • Vitamin D supplementation.
  • Medicines to treat high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and high triglyceride levels.
  • Antibiotics to control infections.
DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.  

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