Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea: Description, Causes and Risk Factors: It is popularly known as Clap, The drip. GonorrheaGonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae), that grow in warm, moist areas of the body including the tube that carries urine out of the body. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control), it is the second most commonly reported disease in the United States. Any sexually active person can be infected with gonorrhea. Risk Factors:
  • Do not use a condom during sex.
  • Have multiple sexual partners.
  • Have a partner with a past history of any sexually transmitted disease.
  • Have a drug addiction.
The best way to prevent gonorrhea or any STD is to practice abstinence, or not having vaginal, oral, or anal sex and having only one partner. Symptoms: The symptoms usually appear two to five days after the person becomes infected. For women symptoms include:
  • Pain or burning when passing urine.
  • Increased urinary frequency.
  • Yellow and bloody vaginal discharge.
  • Bleeding between menstrual periods.
  • Pain during sex.
For men symptoms include:
  • Pain inside the penis.
  • Pain or burning while passing urine.
  • Increased urinary frequency.
  • Painful or swollen testicles.
Diagnosis: Health care providers usually use three laboratory techniques to diagnose gonorrhea, staining samples directly for the bacterium, detecting bacterial genes or DNA in urine, growing the bacteria in laboratory cultures. Tests include:
  • Gram stain: This is done right in a clinic or physician's office. A sample from the urethra or a cervix is placed on a slide and stained with dye. It allows the doctor to see the bacteria under a microscope. This test works better for men than for women.
  • Urine test: Gonorrhea in the cervix or urethra can be diagnosed with a urine sample sent to a lab.
  • Swab sample: A swab sample from the part of the body likely to be infected (cervix, urethra, penis, rectum, or throat) can be sent to a lab for testing.
Treatment: Never treat yourself without being seen by your doctor first. Your health care provider will determine the best and most up-to-date treatment. Your health care providers usually prescribe a single dose of antibiotics. The most common antibiotics used to treat gonorrhea include: Cefixime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin. Pregnant women, or people younger than 18 years old should not take ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin, but health care providers will provide the safest and best antibiotic for each individual patient. A follow-up visit 7 to 10 days after treatment is important if joint pain, skin rash, or more severe pelvic or belly pain is present. Tests will be done to make sure the infection is gone. Note: The above information is educational purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.  

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