Haglunds syndrome

Haglund's syndrome: Description, Causes and Risk Factors:Haglund's syndromeHaglund's syndrome is a deformity of the foot. It is also known as "pump bump." The condition arises when the bony section of your heel, where the Achilles tendon is located, is enlarged.The condition is caused by mechanically induced inflammation of the superficial bursa. Achilles tendinitis, retrocalcaneal bursitis due to repetitive compression from the back of the shoes, and prominent bursal projection of the calcaneum.Patients with Haglund's syndrome range in age from young adult to elderly, are of either sex although the condition is more common among women, and have varying patterns of daily activity. Hind-foot varus and pes cavus are predisposing factors. Chronic stress is also play a role in etiology.Symptoms:Symptoms of Haglund's syndrome include:A very noticeable bump on the back of the heel. Diagnosis:Haglund's syndrome can be difficult to diagnose because the symptoms are similar to other foot issues like arthritis.Sometimes doctors can diagnose the condition by the appearance of the heel. If Haglund's is suspected, you may receive an X-ray of your heel bone. This will help your doctor determine if you have the prominent heel bone associated with the disease.Your X-rays may also help your doctor shape orthotics to relieve your heel pain. Orthotics are customized shoe inserts made to stabilize your foot.Treatment:Treatment for Haglund's usually focuses on relieving pain and taking pressure off the heel bone. Non-surgical options include:Wearing open-heel shoes, such as clogs.
  • NSAIDs pain relievers, like Tylenol®.
  • Icing for 20 to 40 minutes a day to reduce swelling.
  • Iontophoresis, which uses a weak electrical current to help anti-inflammatory drugs penetrate the skin.
  • Ultrasound treatments.
  • Moist heat.
  • Soft tissue massage.
  • Orthotics.
  • Heel and cushion pads to reduce pressure from shoes.
Surgical Options: Surgery can also be used to treat this condition if less invasive methods fail. During surgery, the doctor will remove the excess bone from your heel. The bone may also be smoothed and filed down. This reduces the pressure on the bursa and soft tissue. After surgery, it will take up to eight weeks for you to heal. Your doctor will normally provide you with a wooden shoe or cast to protect your foot. You may also need to use crutches for a few days. The cut will remain bandaged for seven days. Within two weeks, your stitches will be removed. Doctors will X-ray your foot on follow-up visits to ensure it is healing properly.NOTE: The above information is educational purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care. 

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