Lymphopoliferative disorder


Lymphoproliferative disorder

Description, Causes and Risk Factors:

Abbreviation: LPD.

Alternative Name: Lymphoproliferative syndrome.

LPD refer to condition rather than disease. This is a condition in which lymphocytes are produced in excessive quantities. The two major types of lymphocytes are T-cell and B-cell. T cells, which help control the body's immune reactions, and B cells, which produce antibodies to fight infection. These cells circulate in the blood and lymphatic system, and participate in the body's direct attack against foreign invaders.

LPD typically occur in patients who have compromised immune systems. There are several inherited gene mutations that have been identified to cause LPD.

Types of LPDs include:

    X-linked Lymphoproliferative disorder.

  • Autosomal Lymphoproliferative disorder.

LPD occurs at any age group. Overall, male-to-female ration is 1:1.

Risk Factors:

    Children who have a compromised immune system are 10 to 300 times more likely to develop a LPD.

  • After organ transplants LPDs are one of the most serious threats to the patient.

Symptoms:

Some common signs:

    Adenopathy.

  • Splenomegaly.

  • Anemia.

  • Excessive sweating.

  • Fever.

  • Fatigue.

  • Loss of weight.

  • Skin rash.

Diagnosis:

Some tests for LPDs:

    Serologic tests for EBV (Epstein-Barr virus).

  • Measure ESR (erythrocytes sedimentation rate).

  • Evaluate electrolyte, BUN, creatinine, phosphates, calcium and uric acid levels.

Imaging studies:

    CT scan and MRI scans.

  • Bone scanning.

  • Ultrasonography (It is sometimes helpful).

Doctors confirm LPD through a biopsy of the bone marrow, or by using flow cytometric analysis of the circulating blood or bone marrow cells, a procedure in which various types of blood or bone marrow cells are separated, identified, and counted.

Treatment:

Specific treatments are used depending on the predominant symptoms, types and stage. Surgical resection can sometimes play an important role in managing lymphoproliferative disorders.

Note:The above information is educational purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

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