Osteitis condensans ilii


Osteitis condensans ilii

Description, Causes and Risk Factors:

Symmetric benign osteosclerosis of the portion of the iliac bones adjacent to the sacroiliac joints. Osteitis condensans ilii is a bone sclerosis characterized by nonspecific inflammation, highly dense bone hardening phenomenon, particularly in the ilium by 2/3 of the more obvious, but you do not change the joint space. The disease is 90 percent for middle-aged woman, especially late in the pregnancy, childbirth, and other infections of pelvic cavity.

osteitis condensans ilii

Osteitis condensans ilii is a benign sclerosis of the ilium that is commonly seen in young women and has an estimated prevalence of between 1.0% to 3%. The condition is thought to be related to pregnancy, althout it can be seen in men and nulliparous women. When related to pregnancy, it is hypothesized that ligamentous laxity at the sacroiliac joints leads to instability and subsequent sclerosis.

While usually an incidental finding, patients with osteitis condensans ilii are more likely to have sacroiliac joint tenderness compared to controls. A high prevalence of back pain has been reported in patients with osteitis condensans ilii, but controlled studies have not been performed, and the association may be coincidental. In other words, a finding of osteitis condensans ilii should not be taken as an explanation of back pain witout excluding other etiologies.

Bone remodeling due to stress induced vascularity across sacroiliac joints is also be the possible causative factor. Similar isolated changes can occur in pubic bones, medial end of clavicle and other sites.

The condition may resolve spontaneously and radiological picture may also change from time to time. Therapy consists of posture correction and active exercises for 6-12 months. A few nonresponsive cases may require sacroiliac fusion surgery.

Symptoms:

Symptoms may include:

    Severe and steady pain.

  • Pain that comes and goes (intermittent).

  • Dull aching.

  • Sharp pains or cramping.

  • Pressure or heaviness deep within your pelvis.

In addition, you may experience:

    Pain during intercourse.

  • Pain while having a bowel movement.

  • Pain when you sit down.

Your discomfort may intensify after standing for long periods and may be relieved when you lie down. The pain may be mild and annoying, or it may be so severe that you miss work, can't sleep and can't exercise.

Diagnosis:

The radiological criteria for diagnosis were: (a) the presence of a homogeneous triangular area of increased density involving the ilium adjacent to the sacroiliac joint and located at the lower border of the articulating surface of the ilium; (b) normal appearing sacroiliac articulating surfaces and joint space; (c) little or no radiologic evidence of involvement of the sacrum; (d) minimal or no spurring at the lower margin of the sacroiliac joint.

Caution must be used in distinguishing osteitis condensans ilii from several other diseases. Probably the condition most resembling it is hypertrophic arthritis of the sacroiliac joint. Here, however, the area of condensation is usually much smaller and is located at the most caudad portion of the sacroiliac joint. The joint space may be narrowed and the typical finding of eburnation with spurring is present. The process also involves the sacrum and it does not improve with time. One should look for a history of injury or other skeletal abnormalities to support this diagnosis.

Treatment:

In the majority of patient, conservative treatment has been employed. The most important single measure has been the correction, where possible, of obvious postural defects. This was accomplished primarily through training in active muscle exercises under the supervision of competent physical therapist. This training was continued until such time as the correct posture could be maintained by the patient without conscious muscular effort, - usually six months to one year. Postural training was further supplemented by reduction of excessive weight, by increased rest and the use of bed board, and occasionally by an adequate corset.”

If the ilium is fractured, there is a chance it could become infected. If this happens, and if the infection resists antibiotics, it is sometimes necessary to undergo surgery. In some cases, part of the ilium is removed, and a tube is placed into the pelvic region and grafted over to hold it in place, which allows the infection to drain from the body.

NOTE: The above information is for processing purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

43 Comments

  1. Jennifer Leigh

    I have this condition and it is extremely painful.

    Reply
    • Nonna Harris

      Me too. The doctors did nothing. They said I wasn’t in pain. They refuse to help me. My OBGYN didn’t help me when I was pregnant and in so much pain. My daughter going to be three this year. I wish someone would help me understand and explain to me why I’m in so much pain.

      Reply
      • Dr. M

        You should direct your attention to a practitioner who works directly with the muscle, bone and joint. I suggest Either a PT or Chiropractor. This is a rare condition but one in which conservative measures have helped. I hope this finds you both well.

        Reply
        • Jennifer

          I have been diagnosed with this condition, but I’ve had 3 different diagnosis, sacroilitus, and double sciatic from lower back issue. I’ve had 3 pregnancies – I’m very confused and nothing I do seems to help. I’ve had to force my doctors to send me for MRI to get explanations.. I’ve now got a recurring pain under my right rib, that makes it difficult to get out of bed in the morning, but disappears throughout the day – an ultrasound revealed nothing was wrong, so I’m asking my doctor to send me for a chest X-ray … can this also be related to my hips/lower back?

          Reply
        • ditte sacho mathiassen

          hi dr.M

          i have a support group on facebook for women with severe pain from OCI – we’re about 135 now

          we have a huge problem….no doctor recognizes OCI as a cronic and higly painfull condition….a lot of my girls are sent to physical therapy for 6-12 or other workouts to “get better and go back to work” on doctor’s or insurance compagny order’s but that just makes the OCI pain just gets worse and worse with any kind of movement

          i need a real “bone nerd” to help me change what is on the internet about OCI…i want a doctor googling OCI to find out about the pain and how disabling it can be – so my girls (and I) can get proper help

          i got sjaeldnediagnoser.com (rare diagnose organisation in scandinavia) to recognize OCI as a rare condition and they made a diagnose specific network for us in scandinavia….but i need to do more!

          – can you help? and if you can’t, can you point me in a direction wher i can go next?

          thank you ?

          ditte zacho mathiassen, denmark

          Reply
          • Sundari

            I got diagnosed with OCI about 10 yrs ago. Found a wonderful orthopedic who helped me figure out what caused the pain and how to maintain this problem. I have noticed I cannot get stressed (I meditate for resucing stress), I cannot sit on hard surfaces, cannot stand for a long period of time, cannot sit for more than 2-3 hours at a stretch, cannot wear a belt on my waist or any tight fitting outfits, cannot wear flats as I am flat footed, cannot carry any heavy weights (including grocery or exercise weights). I worked on some good strength training exercise, strengthened my core, my only form of exercise is “walking”. Has helped me a lot in controlling my pain. Yes, there have beendays when the pain gets worse and I pop an Extra strength Tylenol or Aleeve. I also took a cortizone shot, my friend is a pain management doctor who helped me find that exact spot under Ultrasound/Xray for my cortizone ahot. Gave me relief for couple years.

      • Daphne Heard

        We should start a support group

        Reply
        • Larrice Reid

          has anyone started a support group?

          Reply
          • ditte zacho mathiassen

            come join my support group on facebook – we’re a hundred + girls with the same problem ? the group is just called “osteitis condensans ilii”

        • Ellen Shouldis

          There is a support group on Facebook.

          Reply
    • Nicola Cooper

      What sort of symptoms/ pain do you experience? I was told I have this – diagnosed from X-ray and MRI. I’ve had chronic pain for about 6 years now. Feels almost nerve like at times. Only have pain in lower back and down one leg. Muscle wastage on the leg; cramps; pain spasms; sharp shooting pain and chronic dull ache to throbbing. It’s awful!

      Reply
    • ditte zacho mathiassen

      come find my group for OCI girls on facebook ?

      Reply
      • Vanessa Q.

        What is the group called? I was recently diagnosed and my doctors have little knowledge one what to do with me. Mine is very severe as I had it for over a decade now before anyone did anything to find it after I begged for an MRI but they said I was too young to have anything that serious. They found it through a CT scan with dye looking for something else. Now my whole right hip and leg are in awful shape. They said it was sciatica for years until they found it in the scan.

        Reply
        • Karen

          I’ve had mine for 32 years after falling down stairs and never having treatment! I was an early teen at the time. To only diagnosed today, after 10 years ago been misdiagnosed with arthritis in SI joint. My doctor looked at the radiologists report and said “I don’t know what that is!”

          Reply
        • ditte zacho marhiassen

          it’s just called “osteitis condensans ilii” …we are a hundred + girls in pain like you are ?

          Reply
        • ditte zacho mathiassen

          its just called osteitis condensans ilii – come find us ! ?

          Reply
      • Shellie Fleming

        I have OCI as well can you add me to the group? I was told 14 years ago that I had “mild arthritis”. I was going through my medical records for an upcoming doc appointment and I was diagnosed with OCI! I’m tired of suffering.

        Reply
      • Larrice Reid

        I can’t find you on facebook please look me up and add to group LarriceReid

        Reply
      • Susan

        What is you facebook group called?

        Thanks

        Reply
    • Daphne Heard

      I do too and would love to talk with some one who understand

      Reply
    • Laura

      I got diagnosed today my doctor has never heard of it he had to read up on it and he has referred me to orthopaedics

      Reply
      • ditte zacho mathiassen

        come join my support group “osteitis condensans ilii” on facebook…..we talk about the pain,what we can do about it and how the damn doctors treat us ?

        Reply
    • Amber Partridge

      I have been diagnosed with this and everyone acts like it’s nothing. I can’t sit, stand up, sleep, clean my house, have a bowel movement or have sex without almost being in tears. It is burning pain or it feels like my hips are being ripped out of my body.
      I hate that doctors don’t take our pain seriously. We need to band together and start a group or something.

      Reply
      • Daphne Heard

        That’s exactly what I’m going through and I’m definitely with any movement so that they recognize are disease my pain has went untreated since I was diagnosed and I go through all the same things you just described on a daily basis I’m a mother and I feel like a poor one at that because my prevent pain prevents me from doing all things i wanna with them and for them

        Reply
      • Maggie

        Me too 🙁

        Reply
    • ditte zacho mathiassen

      come join my support group on facebook – we’re a hundred + girls with the same problem 🙂 the group is just called “osteitis condensans ilii”

      xo from Ditte

      Reply
    • ditte zacho mathiassen

      come join my support group on facebook – we’re a hundred + girls with the same problem ? the group is just called “osteitis condensans ilii”

      Reply
  2. Shilpa

    I do have this pain and drag myself a whole day. I cannot enjoy my life. I hate my life so much that I couldnt be active like I was before my pregnancy. But nobody cares including my doctors. Sometimes I just stuck in bed or on the floor. Nobody understand my pain level. I cant exercise due to severe pain. Only way infront of me is to starve to reduce my weight.

    Reply
  3. Jenna

    I feel for all of you and am so sorry for you pain! Just diagnosed with this myself, 32 yr old female with no pregnancy history. The only thing I can think of that caused this was spending my 20s backpacking around the US carrying a 70-90 pound backpack everyday, usual for 5-10 miles a day on average. I’m researching on google now and as I’m sure you know, there isn’t much information on the problem, let alone suggestions for PT or other treatment. Do any of you know of an online support group for this, or can we make one? Will check back and see if anyone responded. Getting to the point where some days I’m moderately okay and some days I can’t walk without a cane, the worst days not even being able to get out of bed to pee without a person or support on both sides. Again, so sorry to hear you all are dealing with this. Maybe we can talk about it? Take care and good luck to you all!

    Reply
    • ditte zacho mathiassen

      come find my group for OCI girls on facebook – we are now 13 with this rare disease from all around the world?

      Reply
      • Daphne Heard

        I have it too and I stay in Georgia can someone please contact me I’m a leave an email

        Reply
      • Niharika

        Hi what’s the GP name ,I wish to join may be we can guide each other in one or the other way

        Reply
      • Pia T.

        Hello 🙂
        I have it too. Can’t find the Group on facebook??

        Reply
    • Hippaingirl

      That is MY STORY! I have been wondering if it was pregnancy related, because I did have some hip issues during pregnancy due to weight gain (I thought), but some years before I had carried a heavy backpack traveling around for half a year. I have been wondering if that’s where it may have started. I did not have any issues for many years after pregnancy, then a rear-end collision (someone rear-ended me) seemed to trigger chronic pain in left hip…and no therapies, injections, ablations, nothing seems to work. Just drugs. Which make me tired and flaky. But only thing that brings relief. Anti-inflammatories don’t work for me. Tylenol doesn’t work. PT didn’t help. Injections didn’t work. Burning nerves–nope. I’m joining that FB group for support because I feel alone and crazy with this!!

      Reply
  4. Nyree

    I was looking for a remedy for my diagnosed illi condensans. Ever since i got my eldest daughter 6 years a go i daily experience pain. Tried diverse treatments but the pain keeps on coming back. I would love to share experiences. What is de name of the Facebook group? Im from the Netherlands.

    Reply
    • Denice

      Hallo Nyree
      Hoe doet u met die pijnen, heb je hulp gehad… laat mij weten wat er voor jou is gedaan tenzij u geholpen ben.

      Groetjes, Denice

      Reply
    • Daphne Heard

      I on fb i can’t find the group either anybody anybody can feel free to reach out to me

      Reply
  5. Hiedi

    Hello … I just found out That I too suffer from this… only my doctor didn’t tell me I took i upon myself to look up my test results from my CT scan….: my pain is very bad around the time of my period and it’s so bad that sometimes I have to get my husband to help me out of bed because walking can be almost impossible at times… why has my doctor not mentioned this to me ? I have complained and complained and my pain gets dismissed it’s very frustrating

    Reply
    • Daphne Heard

      Our is 2

      Reply
  6. suni jacob

    i have been suffering with this for the last 14 years, doctor told usually it happens in multiparous, i have only 2 daughters, he advised me to take injection in the SI joint

    Reply
  7. Christine J

    I too was diagnosed with OCI from an MRI. I started having severe pain on the right side of my hip/gluten area 6 months post-partum with my first child. I went to an orthopedic surgeon who said I had sciatic nerve pain and recommended physical therapy. I also saw a chiropractor for 3 months prior to that. Then I got pregnant with my second child and went to a different physical therapist where she diagnosed me with SI issues, not sciatic. But after 2 1/2 years with no relief and me crawling on the floor to get around I went to another chiropractor who ordered an X-ray and MRI. From the MRI the radiologist diagnosed me with OCI. I know many of you are looking for some relief, and I’m not a doctor, but the second chiropractor recommended a more natural anti-inflammatory supplement called Pro-enz (bought off of Amazon). He said many athletes use it. I was getting great relief with it (you need to find a dose that works for you), but now I’m pregnant with my 3rd child and had to stop taking it. I was doing well until this weekend! My right hip is on fire and I can’t sit or stand and I have some numbness down my right leg. I know it’s only going to get worse as my pregnancy progresses. My physical therapist also recommended to avoid twisting and bending (i.e. vacuuming, mopping), stairs, heavy lifting and to help strengthen my core which will help strengthen my pelvic area to complete pool exercises. She also said to look at my diet because so many foods can add to the inflammation, such as, soy, corn, wheat, dairy and peanuts. I feel all your pain and hope we all get relief soon!

    Reply
  8. Suman

    Hi, it’s all so very painful to hear the above mentioned conditions. I have been suffering from this problem since last 10 years.

    Reply
  9. Ellen Shouldis

    I wish the author of this would see how many of us describe this as extremely painful. We have tried pt, chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, medicines upon medicines…. The list goes on.

    To any doctor or researcher who is reading this, please find anything to help us feel normal again.

    Reply

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