Raynaud syndrome


Raynaud syndrome

Description

Idiopathic paroxysmal bilateral cyanosis of the digits due to arterial and arteriolar contraction; caused by cold or emotion. Raynaud's phenomenon is a condition in which cold temperatures or strong emotions cause blood vessel spasms that block blood flow to the fingers, toes, ears, and nose.

Abbreviation: RS.

ICD-9: 443.0.

Alternative Name: Symmetric asphyxia, Raynaud disease.

This is a condition in which the smallest arteries that bring blood to the fingers or toes get spasm when exposed to cold or from an emotional upset. This is a disease that may remain dormant for years and come back suddenly brought on by infection, fatigue, or nervous exhaustion. During an attack the fingers become deeply blue or white and blue. Sometimes the fingers perspire. The vessels in the hand constrict until circulation ceases and the fingers deform. Sometimes gangrene will set it. It is frequently considered a nervous condition.

Recent surveys show that Raynaud's syndrome may affect 5 to 10 percent of the general population. Women are more likely than men to have the disorder. Raynaud's syndrome appears to be more common in people who live in colder climates. However, people with the disorder who live in milder climates may have more attacks during periods of colder weather.

The origin of Raynaud's disease remains unknown, although, some theories say that an antibody immune response may be involved. This is supported by the fact that patients with Raynaud's have abnormal immunologic test results.

Other theories for Raynaud's disease talk about vascular hyperactivity that is caused by cold temperatures or emotional stress. However, the question of why the blood vessels overreact remains unanswered.

Types:

Raynaud's disease or idiopathic Raynaud's: This happens when there is no other underlying condition associated with the disorder and most commonly affects the hands and feet.

Raynaud's Phenomenon or Raynaud Syndrome: This is also known as Secondary Raynaud's and is a condition often associated with autoimmune diseases or connective tissue disorders such as scleroderma, systemic lupus, polymyositis, Sj

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