Tinea nigra


Tinea nigra

Description, Causes and Risk Factors:

Alternative Name: Pityriasis nigra.

ICD-10: B36.1.

A fungus infection due to Exophiala werneckii, marked by dark lesions giving a spattered appearance and occurring most commonly on the palms of the hands.

Tinea nigra is a rare superficial fungal infection of the skin. It is caused by Hortaea werneckii (formerly known as Phaeoannellomyces werneckii, Exophiala werneckii, and Cladosporium werneckii). Such dematiaceous fungi are commonly found in soil, sewage, and decaying vegetation. You may contract the fungus if you are around any of these materials and you suffer an injury that involves a break in the skin. Tinea nigra arises after inoculation subsequent to trauma and has a typical incubation period of 2 to 7 weeks.

It occurs most frequently in tropical climates and presents as asymptomatic brown to black nonscaly macules with well-defined borders resembling silver nitrate stains. Macules may be single or multiple, rounded or may have irregular shapes. Palms are most often affected, but lesions may occur on soles or other parts of the body.

Risk factors may include:

    Children.

  • Young adults.

  • Females.

  • Living or traveling in tropical or subtropical areas.

Symptoms:

Tinea nigra causes a brownish-black patch on the skin. The area tends to expand over time, has an irregular shape, and often sports a darker border. Sometimes the area is itchy or scaly. Patches usually affect the palms of the hands or soles of the feet. Occasionally, patches may appear on the neck or trunk.

Diagnosis:

Your doctor will ask about your symptoms and medical history, and perform a physical exam. You may need to see a dermatologist for testing, diagnosis, and treatment of this condition. Tinea nigra is diagnosed by scraping a small sample of the affected skin. The sample is cultured in a laboratory and examined under a microscope, where the fungi can be identified.

Treatment:

Tinea nigra is usually treated with topical medications that can be applied to the affected area of skin, such as:

    Whitfield's Ointment.

  • 2% Miconazole cream.

  • 2% Ketoconazole cream.

  • 5-10% Salicylic acid ointment.

Risk and benefits of the medications must be discussed with your PCP.

NOTE: The above information is educational purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

Reference and Source are from:

DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

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