Urosepsis


Urosepsis

Description, Causes and Risk Factors:

Urosepsis is a serious secondary infection which occurs when an infection in the urinary tract spreads to the bloodstream. People with urosepsis have bacteria in their blood. Left untreated, this can potentially be fatal. Due to the risk of urosepsis, people are usually advised to receive prompt treatment for urinary tract infections, especially if they are members of a population which is at increased risk of secondary infections which arise from urinary tract infections. If urosepsis is suspected, treatment should be aggressive and timely to minimize complications.

Urosepsis is caused by a bacterial infection of the urinary tract or prostate that spreads into the bloodstream. Even if you are in general good health, many of the bacteria that cause urosepsis can normally occur in your intestines.

Risk Factors:

    Advanced age.

  • Diabetes.

  • Fecal incontinence (inability to control stools).

  • Female gender.

  • Immobility.

  • Incomplete bladder emptying or urinary retention.

  • Polycystic kidney disease.

  • Pregnancy.

  • Surgeries or procedures involving the urinary tract.

  • Urinary tract obstruction by stones, an enlarged prostate, urethral scarring, or other causes.

  • Use of catheters to drain urine.

Preventive measures:

    Empty your bladder often. Avoid holding urine for long periods of time.

  • After a bowel movement, women should wipe from front to back. Use each tissue only once.

  • Empty your bladder before and after sexual intercourse.

Symptoms:

Symptoms may include:

    Abdominal, pelvic or back pain or cramping.

  • Bloody or pink-colored urine (hematuria).

  • Cloudy urine.

  • Difficult or painful urination, or burning with urination (dysuria).

  • Fever and chills.

  • Foul-smelling urine.

  • Frequent urination.

  • General ill feeling.

  • Pain during sexual intercourse.

  • Urgent need to urinate.

Diagnosis:

Your caregiver may suspect urosepsis based on your history and a physical exam. Urine and blood tests may be done. Other tests, such as X-rays, ultrasound exams, or a CT scan may be used to determine the severity of your condition.

Treatment:

The primary treatment for urosepsis is the use of antibiotics to get rid of the infection. Your treatment may also include supportive measures such as intravenous fluids (IV fluids), and oxygen therapy may be used. If your case is severe, medications may be used to increase your blood pressure and mechanical ventilation may be required.

NOTE: The above information is educational purpose. The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition.

DISCLAIMER: This information should not substitute for seeking responsible, professional medical care.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Cart Preview

Study Confirms that Microplastics Accumulate in Human Faeces

Study Confirms that Microplastics Accumulate in Human Faeces

A new study from Austria finds evidence that microplastics, such as extremely small pieces of plastic beads, fibers, or fragments, accumulate in human feces. A team of scientist from the Environment Agency Austria and the Medical University of Vienna has analyzed the...

The 7 Signs Your Body Doesn’t Get Enough Protein

The 7 Signs Your Body Doesn’t Get Enough Protein

Nowadays, everyone knows what protein is but only a few of us know for sure how much of it we need to consume. According to government guidelines, average protein consumption should be 0.8g per kilogram of body weight. The next seven signs show you’re not getting...

[WpProQuiz 1]

Featured Products

The 5 Best Accessories for Sports Fans

It is very entertaining to be a sport fan. There is a big variety of sport games that are extremely interesting to follow. Moreover, it is always fun to anticipate the score and watch the enthusiasm live. One of the benefits of being sports fan is using different...

read more

Exercise May Serve as an Antidepressant

A new study of nearly 18,000 participants found that those with high fitness at middle age were significantly less likely to die from heart disease in later life, even if they were diagnosed with depression. Doctor's Tips: How to Stay Fit While Treating Depression Dr....

read more

Fitness: Warm Ups Can Chill Out the Perfomance

The warm ups are supposed to increase body temperature and blood flow so the muscles and surrounding joints become more responsive and prepared for physical activity. Although there’s a neurological element to warm-ups, most research focuses on the physiological...

read more