Four Cups of Coffee Daily Might Protect Cells of the Heart

Scientists from Heinrich-Heine-University and the IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Düsseldorf, Germany, suggest that consuming the amount of caffeine equivalent to four cups of coffee might be enough to protect the cells of the heart.four cups of coffee protect heart

In the study, the scientists discovered a new enzyme within mitochondria appearing to be relevant to caffeine’s protecting effect: p27. Using the mice models, the researchers found that caffeine protected against heart damage in prediabetic, older, and obese mice.

Lead researchers Judith Haendeler concludes: “These results should lead to better strategies for protecting heart muscle from damage, including consideration of coffee consumption or caffeine as an additional dietary factor in the elderly population.”

A Simple Blood Test for ASD Can Predict the Condition with 88% Accuracy

Last year a team of researchers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, US, developed a simple blood test for diagnosing ASD (autism spectrum disorder). At the present moment, a follow-up study confirms the original finding.simple-blood-test-for-autism

In this test, there is an algorithm that takes into account the presence and concentration of numerous chemicals in the blood associated with ASD.

To make the test more predictive, the scientists worked with children divided into several groups within the existing studies. Using the test, they found 154 aged from 2 5o 17 years.

Systems biologist and senior author Juergen Hahn says: “This is an approach that we would like to see move forward into clinical trials and ultimately into a commercially available test.” She also adds: “We were able to predict with 88% accuracy whether children have autism.”

Being Married May Cut the Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

According to a recent analysis of existing studies in the UK, single, divorced and widowed people have higher chances to develop heart disease and stroke. That’s why the authors of the study believe that being married can be another factor that cuts the risk of cardiovascular disease.being married cuts the risk of heart disease

For the study, a team of researchers examined 34 studies from around the world which included over 2 million participants altogether aged from 42 to 77. The results of the analysis showed that single, divorced or widowed people had 42% higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared to married participants.

Lead study author Chun Wai Wong and colleagues conclude: “Future research should focus around whether marital status is a surrogate marker for other adverse health behavior or cardiovascular risk profiles that underlines our reported findings or whether marital status should be considered as a risk factor by itself.”

These 10 Things Happen to Your Body When You Overeat

All of us at least once in life overate – you’re appearing at a birthday party with the intention not to eat too much but then something goes completely wrong. Give a look at what’s happening to your body when you overeat. Maybe this will help you to stop eating at the right moment:what happens to your body when you overeat

  1. Your stomach stretches to make room for excessive food.
  2. Your digestive system filled with air, especially if you drink bubbly carbonated beverages or eat quickly.
  3. Your metabolism attempts to burn off extra calories and your body temperature grows.
  4. Overeating messes up with your sleeping rhythm so it might be difficult for you to fall asleep.
  5. Your body mat sped up the digestion leading to diarrhea.
  6. You may feel nausea.
  7. When your metabolism and heart rate speed up to digest the food, you may feel dizziness.
  8. Your insulin rate rises really high.
  9. You may feel fatigue and exhaustion.
  10. You feel really hungry next day due to lack of sleep and hormone disruption.

Early Birds Have Lower Risk of Developing Depression

A recent research from the US finds that people who go to bed and wake up early have a lower risk of developing depression.early birds have lower risk of depression

A team of researchers analyzed the relevant medical data of 32,470 female participants who were aged 55 years on average. In 2009, at the start of the study, all participants were depression-free. In the course of the study, they reported changes in their health in questionnaires after 2 years.

Having analyzed the gathered data, the team concluded that early birds had a 12–27% lower risk of depression than other participants.

Lead study author Céline Vetter says: “Alternatively, when and how much light you get also influences chronotype, and light exposure also influences depression risk. Disentangling the contribution of light patterns and genetics on the link between chronotype and depression risk is an important next step.”