Study: Sleep Deprivation Linked to the Higher Sensitivity to Pain

Sleep Deprivation Linked to the Higher Sensitivity to Pain

According to the recent research, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, sleep deprivation is associated with the increased sensitivity to pain due to numbing the natural mechanisms of the painkilling response of the brain.

For the research, the scientists induced pain in 24 healthy young volunteers applying heat to their legs while scanning the brains of these participants to examine the circuits that process pain. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers found that those participants with inadequate sleep were feeling discomfort at lower temperatures.

Professor Matthew Walker from the University of California in Berkeley, one of the authors of the study, says: “Our findings suggest that patient care would be markedly improved, and hospital beds cleared sooner, if uninterrupted sleep were embraced as an integral component of healthcare management.”

Artificial Sweeteners Don’t Have Any Benefits for Health

According to a new study, published in The BMJ, artificial sweeteners have no benefits or harms to human health.

For the study, a team of scientists assessed 56 research papers which included adult and child participants. They examined a range of parameters, including oral health, kidney and cardiovascular disease, cancer, blood sugar levels, behavior, mood, and, importantly, weight and body mass index.

In conclusion, the authors write: “For most outcomes, there seemed to be no statistically or clinically relevant difference between [non-sugar sweetener] intake versus no intake or between different doses of [non-sugar sweeteners].”

Refusing from Alcohol for a Month Brings Lasting Health Benefits

According to recent British research, giving up alcohol for just one month may bring lasting health benefits. Researchers report that people who didn’t drink the whole January in 2018 had higher energy levels and healthier body weight.

For research, a team of scientists analyzed data collected during Dry January initiative through online surveys. In total, the researchers examined data from 2,821 participants.

The lead researcher Dr. Richard de Visser from the University of Sussex says: “The simple act of taking a month off alcohol helps people drink less in the long term; by August, people are reporting one extra dry day per week. There are also considerable immediate benefits: nine in 10 people save money, seven in 10 sleep better, and three in five lose weight.”

Refusing from Alcohol for a Month Brings Lasting Health Benefits

According to recent British research, giving up alcohol for just one month may bring lasting health benefits. Researchers report that people who didn’t drink the whole January in 2018 had higher energy levels and healthier body weight.

For research, a team of scientists analyzed data collected during Dry January initiative through online surveys. In total, the researchers examined data from 2,821 participants.

The lead researcher Dr. Richard de Visser from the University of Sussex says: “The simple act of taking a month off alcohol helps people drink less in the long term; by August, people are reporting one extra dry day per week. There are also considerable immediate benefits: nine in 10 people save money, seven in 10 sleep better, and three in five lose weight.”

Refusing from Alcohol for a Month Brings Lasting Health Benefits

According to recent British research, giving up alcohol for just one month may bring lasting health benefits. Researchers report that people who didn’t drink the whole January in 2018 had higher energy levels and healthier body weight.

For research, a team of scientists analyzed data collected during Dry January initiative through online surveys. In total, the researchers examined data from 2,821 participants.

The lead researcher Dr. Richard de Visser from the University of Sussex says: “The simple act of taking a month off alcohol helps people drink less in the long term; by August, people are reporting one extra dry day per week. There are also considerable immediate benefits: nine in 10 people save money, seven in 10 sleep better, and three in five lose weight.”

Refusing from Alcohol for a Month Brings Lasting Health Benefits

According to recent British research, giving up alcohol for just one month may bring lasting health benefits. Researchers report that people who didn’t drink the whole of January in 2018 had higher energy levels and healthier body weight.

For research, a team of scientists analyzed data collected during Dry January initiative through online surveys. In total, the researchers examined data from 2,821 participants.

The lead researcher Dr. Richard de Visser from the University of Sussex says: “The simple act of taking a month off alcohol helps people drink less in the long term; by August, people are reporting one extra dry day per week. There are also considerable immediate benefits: nine in 10 people save money, seven in 10 sleep better, and three in five lose weight.”