Scientists Found Brain’s Trigger for Binge Eating

According to the report, published in the journal Neuron, scientists have located an area in the brain that links an external trigger to binge eating. The findings suggest that neurons in this largely unstudied area of the brain are connected to the tendency to overindulge in response to external triggers. This explains the problem that many people get addicted to food, alcohol, and drugs.binge eating

In the study, researchers found when they suppressed certain neurons in that area, rats that responded to cues for sugar fast and excitedly became less motivated.

Lead author Dr. Jocelyn M. Richard, MD at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore says: “External cues – anything from a glimpse of powder that looks like cocaine or the jingle of an ice cream truck – can trigger a relapse of binge eating. Our findings show where in the brain this connection between environmental stimuli and the seeking of food of drugs is occurring.”

Scientists believe that their findings can help treat addiction in people in the future.

More information here.

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