Living Environment Can Be a Crucial Factor to Longevity

Recent research, performed by the scientists from the Washington State University, US, suggests that people living in walkable areas with mixed-age communities might be more likely to live to their 100th birthday.Living Environment Can Be a Crucial Factor to Longevity

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed state-provided data on the deaths of approximately 145,000 Washingtonians who died at age 75 or older between 2011 and 2015. The analyzed data included such information as age, place of residence at the time of death, sex, race, education level, and marital status.

Study author Rajan Bhardwaj, a second-year WSU medical student, says: “Our findings indicate that mixed-age communities are very beneficial for everyone involved. They also support the big push in growing urban centers toward making streets more walkable, which makes exercise more accessible to older adults and makes it easier for them to access medical care and grocery stores.”

Long-term Study: People Who Walk Slowly May Age Faster

According to a new long-term study, which followed more than 900 people from New Zealand for around 40 years, people in their 40s who walk slowly are more likely to show symptoms of accelerated biological aging and compromised brain integrity.Long-term Study People Who Walk Slowly May Age Faster

Within the scope of the study, the researchers measure the walking speed of participants whose age was 45 years. These participants were also assessed for the presence of accelerated aging signs, which included 19 different biomarkers.

The authors of the study write in their paper: “Remarkably, in our study, gait speed was associated not only with concurrent neurocognitive functioning in adulthood but also with neurocognitive functioning in early childhood.”

A Compound in Broccoli Can Be the Key to Combating Ageing

Broccoli is rich in indoles, chemicals that kept mice fit as they get older. Previously, this team of scientists led by Professor Kalman of Emory University in Atlanta, USA, identified that indoles helped worms and mice resist infection and disease.combating ageing

For the study, the researchers treated mice with antibiotics to eliminate existing flora. After that, they colonized mice with either normal E. coli or bacteria that cannot produce it. In mice aged 28 months, indole helped animals maintain their weight, mobility, and activity levels.

Professor Kalman says: “It’s like the Picture of Dorian Gray in terms of the genes involved. Indoles make old animals look more like the young ones.”

Cycling or Walking to Work Can Extend Your Lifespan

According to a new research, published in The BMJ, cycling or walking to work can lower the risk of death from all causes compared to the inactive ways of commuting. The scientists say that the greatest effect was noticed in cyclists.cycling to work

For their study, the researchers used data from 264,377 participants with an average age of 53 from the UK Biobank (a database containing biological information from more than 500,000 U.K. adults).

Having analyzed the received information, the researchers conclude that “the findings, if causal, suggest population health may be improved by policies that increase active commuting, particularly cycling, such as the creation of cycle lanes, cycle hire, or purchase schemes, and better provision for cycles on public transport.”

New Study Linked Parenthood to Longer Life in Older Age

A new study from Sweden suggests that parenthood may increase your chances of living longer in older age. Researchers believe that living a longer life associated with care and support from the children.parenthood

A team of researchers tracked the lifespan of men and women born between 1911 and 1925 and living in Sweden that is more than 1.4 million in total. They concluded that men and women with at least one kid had the lower risk of death than childless people.

The research reveals that the benefits of having children become more pronounced with age. The team also found that having children had a stronger influence on the longevity of men who were not married than those with a spouse.