Air Pollution Shortens Life Expectancy by Two Years All Over the World

A new study, executed by researchers from the University of Texas at Austin, US, finds that air pollution shortens life expectancy on the global level by up to two years and the situation worsens every year.air pollution shortens life expectancy

For the study, a team of the researchers looked at tiny PM2.5 particles that come from such sources as power plants, exhaust systems, airplanes, forest fires, and dust storms. These particles, due to their small size, stay in the air longer than the heavy ones and get deep into the lungs.

Dr. Joshua Apte, an assistant professor in the department of population health at the University of Texas at Austin, says: “The overall impact of air pollution is big and what we’re doing is putting the health benefits of addressing air pollution into context. For example, it could lead to a life expectancy that’s equivalent to or greater than curing certain import cancers like lung cancer and breast cancer.”

Air Pollution Might Increase the Risk of Developing Diabetes

A new study from the US suggests that poor air quality and diabetes are closely connected. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System in Missouri performed the study.air pollution increases the risk of diabetes

To achieve the set study goal, a team of researchers analyzed the influence of air pollution on a group of United States veterans with no previous history of diabetes. The followed the participants of the study for averagely 8.5 years.

Senior author of the study Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly says: “Our research shows a significant link between air pollution and diabetes globally. We found an increased risk, even at low levels of air pollution currently considered safe by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the WHO.”

Risk of Heart Attack Connected to Certain Blood Types

A new study suggests that the certain blood types might be connected to increased or decreased risk of having heart attack in response to high levels of air pollution.blood types

A team of researchers analyzed data from Intermountain Healthcare patients seen between 1993 and 2007 and concluded that a variant ABO gene, which can be found in blood types A, B, ad AB, has been associated with elevated risk of heart attack during periods of significant air pollution. People with blood type O demonstrated lower risk.

Clinical epidemiologist Benjamin Horne from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, US, explains: “In the information, we provide to our patients about pollution, we try to stress that they can do something about it to reduce their risks. Stay indoors out of pollution. Exercise indoors. And make sure they’re compliant with taking their heart medication to reduce their risk.”

Air Pollution May Mess Up Your Hormones and Metabolism

A new research from China suggests that breathing polluted air can cause stress hormones to spike.air pollution messes up with hormones

A team of researchers from Fudan University in Shanghai exposed 5 volunteer students to polluted air for 12 days. The scientists specifically looked at the health effects of particulate matter (PM), small particles less than 2.5 mm in diameter, from industrial sources. These particles are inhaled and become lodged in the lungs.

At the end of the study, students’ levels of stress hormones cortisol, cortisone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine increased with dirtier air, as well as their levels of blood sugar, amino acids, fatty acids, and lipids.

Dr. Robert D. Brook, a co-author of the study, of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor says: “This evidence-based proof is needed to help provide clinical recommendations for the millions of people with heart diseases living in regions where the poor air quality is not likely to significantly improve over the upcoming decades.”

Researchers Linked the Risk of Heart Disease to Air Pollution

A team of researchers in their early study suggests that the particles of pollution can build up in blood vessels and increase the risk of developing heart disease.air pollution linked to heart disease

The scientists believe that the reason can be that extremely small particles can penetrate the blood system.

To investigate this, the scientists from the University of Edinburgh, UK, and universities in the Netherlands studied nanoparticles of inert that believed to be too small to be removed by the natural body’s filter system in the nose and lungs.

They asked 14 volunteers to breathe in air containing these nanoparticles while working out for 2 hours. The day after, the researchers discovered the gold nanoparticles in the bloodstream of most participants.