Certain Mother’s Diet May Fight Alzheimer’s Disease in Offspring

Mother's diet influences offspring

A new study from the United States finds that certain nutrients in a mother’s diet may reduce the influence of the Alzheimer’s disease on offspring.

For their study, researchers bred mice, genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease from females whose diet was high in choline, a compound similar to B vitamin group which can be found in liver, meat, fish, nuts, spinach, eggs, peas, beans, wheat germ.

Having performed the examination, the scientists discovered that offspring of the females with choline-rich diet showed fewer condition-associated brain changes and improved cognitive performance compared to offspring of non-supplemented mice.

Lead study author Dr. Ramon Velazquez of the Biodesign Institute at ASU comments: “Choline deficits are associated with failure in developing fetuses to fully meet expected milestones like walking and babbling.

Vitamin A Found in Brussels Sprouts May Help Treat Alzheimer’s

Researchers from Aberdeen and Durham Universities developed a medication based on vitamin A, found in Brussels sprouts and carrots, that may stop the breakdown of nerves and brain cells leading to the Alzheimer’s disease.Brussels sprouts help treat Alzheimer's disease

Having completed a two-year project with the cost 250,000, the scientists developed vitamin A synthetically and hope that now they are coming closer to the treatment of such conditions as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and motor neuron disease.

Lead author Professor Peter McCaffery, who researches vitamin A at Aberdeen University, comments: “We are moving forward with a new therapeutic which could be used to help people with Alzheimer’s disease. Our work is still at an early stage but we believe this is a positive development and the new drugs seem to protect [nerve cells].”

New MRI Brain Scan Method Predicts Up to 95% of Alzheimer’s Disease

A small study, conducted by the researchers from Washington University School of Medicine, suggests that a new MRI brain scan can be more efficient in determining the patient’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than common clinical tests, long before the disease setup.MRI brain scan

The study involved 61 participants who were examined with the help of the new method. The new MRI technique has been conducted using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess the state of the brain white matter. The technique was found to be 89–95% accurate.

Study leading author Dr. Cyrus Raji, an assistant professor of radiology at the school’s Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, explains: “With DTI you look at the movement of water molecules along white matter tracts, the telephone cables of the brain. When these tracts are not well connected, cognitive problems can result.”

Scientists Explained Why Smells Revoke Vivid Memories

Our brain combines smell with the information about space and time to form episodic vivid memories, according to a recent research, published in the journal Nature Communications. These findings can help improve sniff tests for the Alzheimer’s disease.smells are associated with vivid memories

In the course of the study, a team of researchers examined the role of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) in memory using a mouse model in a range of experiments. They discovered a previously unknown neural pathway between the hippocampus and the AON.

Study co-author Afif Aqrabawi says: “[The findings demonstrate] that we now understand which circuits in the brain govern the episodic memory for the smell. The circuit can now be used as a model to study fundamental aspects of human episodic memory and the other odor memory deficits seen in neurogenerative conditions.”

A New Study Linked Brain Cholesterol to Alzheimer’s Disease

A new study from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom finds that brain cholesterol is associated with the developing of Alzheimer’s disease.brain cholesterol leads to Alzheimer's

With the help of in vitro modeling in the laboratory, the scientists were able to see that cholesterol sped up the aggregation of amyloid beta molecules by 20. At the present moment, the build-up of amyloid beta proteins is believed to be crucial in developing the Alzheimer’s disease.

Lead researcher Michele Vendruscolo says: “The question for us now is not how to eliminate cholesterol from the brain, but about how to control cholesterol’s role in Alzheimer’s disease through the regulation of its interaction with amyloid beta.”

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