Red Wine Compound May Become Depression Treatment in Future

A new study in mice, conducted by the researchers from Xuzhou Medical University in China, suggests that resveratrol, a red wine compound, can be used for the treatment of depression and anxiety in the future.Red Wine Compound May Become Depression Treatment in Future

In this study, the scientists used animal models and cultured mouse neurons (similar to those in the human hippocampus) to help explain the effect of the compound on rodent behaviors.

Resveratrol, which appears to reduce anxiety and depression in mice, seems to work by inhibiting PDE4D (a member of the PDE4 family that believed to be particularly important in cognition and depression) and activating cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) signaling.

Co-lead author Dr. Ying Xu, Ph.D. says: “Resveratrol may be an effective alternative to drugs for treating patients suffering from depression and anxiety disorders.”

A Machine Learning Algorithm Can Detect Depression in Children’s Speech

Scientists from the University of Vermont, US, developed a machine learning algorithm that is able to detect signs of depression and anxiety in the speech of children under the age of 8.a machine learning algorithm can diagnose a depression in children

The researchers used an adapted version of a mood induction task called the Trier-Social Stress Task, intended to cause feelings of stress and anxiety in the subject. During the study, 71 children aged 3 and 8 were asked to tell a short story within 3 minutes. They were told that they would be judged based on how interesting it was.

To analyze children’s speech, scientists used a machine learning algorithm. The algorithm proved to be very successful at diagnosing children.

Study senior author Ryan McGinnis says: “The algorithm was able to identify children with a diagnosis of an internalizing disorder with 80% accuracy, and in most cases that compared really well to the accuracy of the parent checklist.”

A Compound in Lavender Can Lessen Anxiety without Impairing Movement

New Japanese research finds that linalool, a fragrant compound in lavender, can help lessen anxiety by stimulating the nose to pass signals to the brain, not by being absorbed into the bloodstream through the lungs.lavender lessen anxiety

World Health Organization (WHO), as of 2015, estimates that 3.6 percent of the global population suffers from anxiety disorders. The number varies from country to country.

Study co-author Dr. Hideki Kashiwadani, of the Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences at Kagoshima University, says: “Our study also opens the possibility that relaxation seen in mice fed or injected with linalool could, in fact, be due to the smell of the compound emitted in their exhale breath.”

Neuroscientists Identified Anxiety Cells in Mouse Brain

A new research from neuroscientists at UC San Francisco and the Columbia University Irving Medical Center suggests that feeling of anxiety might be connected to the newly identified anxiety cell in the brain. The study was published in Neuron.anxiety cells

The researchers discovered this type of cells in the hippocampus in the brains of mice. The authors of the study believe that these cells also exist in human brains.

One of the senior investigators Rene Hen, Ph.D., a professor of psychiatry at CUIMC, explains: “We call these anxiety cells because they only fire when the animals are in places that are innately frightening to them. For a mouse, that’s an open area where they’re more exposed to predators, or an elevated platform.”

More British People Suffer from Health Anxiety Fueled by ‘Cyberсhondria’

Researchers from the UK find that health anxiety fueled by looking up symptoms on the internet recourses is a growing problem in the United Kingdom. The condition can also be caused by previous health scares and could affect 1 in 5 hospital patients.health anxiety

A team of researchers from Imperial College London and King’s College London says that the symptoms of health anxiety were often mistaken for those of physical illnesses and included pain in chest and headaches.

Prof Peter Tyrer, emeritus professor in community psychiatry at Imperial College London, says: “We suspect that [health anxiety] is increasing in frequency because of what is now called ‘cyberchondria’. This is because people now go to their GPs with a whole list of things they’ve looked up on the internet, and the poor GP, five minutes into the consultation, has four pages of reading to do.”