Insufficient Sleep May Cause More Asthma Attacks in Adults

A new article, published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, says that insufficient sleep and sometimes excessive sleep may have a negative impact on adults with asthma, namely cause asthma more attacks.Insufficient Sleep May Cause More Asthma Attacks in Adults

In the study, described in the article, 1,389 adults whose age was above 20 years took part and said that they had asthma. Of all the participants, 25.9% slept 5 hours or less, 65.9% slept 6–8 hours, and 8.2% slept 9 and more hours.

People who slept less were more likely to have an asthma attack, dry cough, and an overnight hospitalization during the past year compared to those who had normal. At the same time, people who didn’t sleep enough had worse quality of life.

Allergist Gailen D. Marshall, MD, PhD, ACAAI member and Editor-in-Chief of Annals comments: “This study adds solid evidence to the practice of asthma patients discussing sleep issues with their allergist to help determine if they need to change their asthma plan to achieve adequate sleep as a component of overall good asthma management. It also warns that consequences can be expected when sleep patterns are chronically inadequate.”

Special Diet May Help in Certain Cases of Asthma

A new study from the University of Bonn, Germany, suggests that a special diet, called ketogenic, may help people cope with asthma.Special Diet May Help in Certain Cases of Asthma

For the study, a team of scientists fed a group of mice with a so-called ketogenic diet, a low-carb and high-fat diet. After a certain period of time, the researchers registered reduced inflammation in the respiratory tract.

Prof. Dr. Christoph Wilhelm from the Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, who is a member of the Cluster of Excellence ImmunoSensation at the University of Bonn, explains: “We are therefore trying to determine which components of the dietary change are responsible for the effect. Maybe this will open the door to the development of new drugs.”

Fruit and Vegetables May Cut the Risk of Severe Symptoms of Asthma

According to a new study, performed by the French scientists, people who eat a lot of fruit and vegetables have up to 30% less risk to experience the severe symptoms of asthma.eating fruit and vegetables may cut the risk of severe symptoms of asthma

For their research, a team of scientists studied approximately 35,000 people comparing their diets and the symptoms of their asthma. The analysis of the received data showed that men who eat a more healthy diet tend to have a 30% lower risk to experience the symptoms of asthma. At the same time, women’s risk was 20% lower.

Lead researcher of the study Dr. Roland Andrianasolo says: “Our results strongly encourage the promotion of healthy diets for preventing asthma symptoms and managing the disease.”

Kids Drinking Too Much of Fruit Juice Have More Chances to Get Asthma

Researchers from Harvard University reveal that children who drink sugary fruit juice or whose mothers drank sugary beverages during pregnancy are at 79% greater risk of developing asthma.

A team of scientists has analyzed the data regarding eating habits from 1,000 mother-child pairs. They also examined information on kids’ health, including whether they had been diagnosed with asthma between 7 and 9 years.

Study co-author Sheryl Rifas-Shima says: “In addition to influencing asthma through increasing the risk of obesity, we found that sugary beverages and high fructose may influence the risk of asthma not entirely through obesity. This finding suggests that there are additional mechanisms by which sugary beverages and fructose influence asthma risks beyond their effects on obesity.”

Bitter Compounds Can Be Used to Prevent and Treat Asthma in the Future

A team of researchers from the University of Technology Sydney, Australia, discovered that a flavoring with bitter compounds found in tonic water can prevent asthma, as well as limit characteristics of mice that already have the condition.bitter compounds for asthma

Scientists found that chloroquine and quinine, substances that stimulate bitter taste buds, successfully prevent and mitigate asthma in mice models and human cell culture.

Pawan Sharma, one of the researchers of the study, explains: “We do not have an effective anti-asthma therapy that targets disease progression. Our current research on taste receptors is crucial in identifying new classes of drugs that can be an effective asthma treatment option in future.”