Scientists Identified a Gene Changing the Way Brain Cells Communicate

A team of researchers from McMaster University’s Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute in collaboration with Sick Children’s Hospital identified genetic alterations in the gene DIXDC1 in people with autism spectrum disorder. This gene is responsible for changing the way brain cells communicate and grow.brain cells communicate

The study suggests new insights into ASD that will help develop new medications for individuals with the condition.

Karun Singh, a scientist with the Stem Cell and Cancer Research, who was a lead author of the study, says: “Because we pinpointed why DIXDC1 is turned off in some forms of autism, my lab at the SCCRI, which specializes in drug discovery, now has the opportunity to begin the searching for drugs that will turn DIXDC1 back on and correct synaptic connections. This is exciting because such a drug would have the potential to be a new treatment for autism.”

More information here.