Chocolate May Promote Friendly Gut Bacteria and Reduce Inflammation

Several studies demonstrate that cocoa increases the number friendly gut bacteria and reduce inflammation in the intestine.friendly gut bacteria

A team of scientists from the Department of Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Reading, UK, measured higher levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in the intestines of human volunteers who drank chocolate milk for 4 weeks.

Previously, this team demonstrated that components in cocoa can reduce the growth of Clostridium histoluticum bacteria, that are found in the guts of those people who suffer from bowel disease.

Unsweetened cocoa powder or dark chocolate with the high content of cocoa are the closest options to the cocoa used in these studies.

Mouth Bacteria Can Indicate Different Cancer Risks

A new research found that our mouth bacteria can indicate our risk for different forms of cancer. The scientists suggest that brushing teeth does not just prevent cavities, it also can help cut the risk of developing cancer.mouth bacteria

Several studies discovered a link to such cancers as breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, esophageal cancer and bowel cancer. Although the researchers still do not fully understand this link, they believe that the bacteria travels into the bloodstream and enters different organs where they infect tissues.

The scientists hope that further studying of this phenomenon will bring an ability to tell a person what their cancer risk is only looking for the bacteria present in their bodies.

Air Pollution May Change Bacteria in Respiratory Tract

According to a recent study, executed by a team of researchers from the University of Leicester, UK, and published in the journal Environmental Microbiology, air pollution may affect human health by changing bacteria in respiratory tract.air pollution

The study shows that black carbon, a main component in the polluted air, significantly changes the way how bacteria grow and form biofilms and that can alter their survival in the lining of airways and their resistance to antibiotics.

First author Julie Morrisey, an associate professor of microbial genetics, says: “Our research could initiate an entirely new understanding of how air pollution affects human health. It will lead to enhancement of research to understand how air pollution leads to severe respiratory problems and perturbs the environmental cycles essential for life.”

MediGoo is attending the largest health/medical industry event in Düsseford, Germany. We welcome you to visit our stand at hall 15 booth E55. Welcome, hope to see you there 15E55.