Sedentary Lifestyle Connected to “Older” Cells in Senior Women

A new study investigated the impact of a sedentary lifestyle on the biological age of senior women.sedentary lifestyle

Modern science associates the telomere length with ageing and disease. With age, telomeres become shorter until the cells die or transform into oncogenic cells. Short telomeres are connected to cancer, heart diseases, and diabetes.

The team of researchers at the University of California-San Diego, led by Aladdin Shadyab, Ph.D., from the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UCSD School of Medicine, examined the effects of a sedentary lifestyle on the age of cells in senior women.

According to the findings of the study, women who exercised for under 40 minutes and spent sitting more than 10 hours per day had biologically older cells compared to women who had been sitting less and exercised more. As the scientists note, low physical activity seemed to account for an eight-year biological age gap between those who exercised and those who did not.

More information about the study you can find here.