Pomegranate May Help in Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Researchers from the University of Louisville in Kentucky suggest that natural polyphenols found in pomegranate can fight symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Polyphenols are also present in berries such as strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries.

The scientists found a metabolite named urolithin A (UroA) is produces as a result of polyphenols in fruits and gut bacteria interacting. Using animal model, the researchers demonstrated UroA and UAS03 increase proteins that tighten epithelial cell junctions in the gut.

The first study author Dr Rajbir Singh comments: “The general belief thus far in the field is that urolithins [such as UroA and UAS03] exert beneficial effects through their anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative properties. We have for the first time discovered that their mode of function also includes repairing the gut barrier dysfunction and maintaining barrier integrity.”

Strawberries Could Help Reduce Harmful Inflammation in Colon

A new study, executed by the researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, suggests that eating less than a cup of strawberries on a daily basis may help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon and improve the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).strawberries reduce harmful inflammation

For the research, the scientists used a mice model having split the mice into four groups. Having performed analysis of the received data, the researcher concluded that eating the equivalent of three-quarters of a cup of strawberries each day reduced weight loss and symptoms of IBD such as bloody diarrhea.

In addition, the mice that consumed strawberries showed the reduced levels of harmful gut bacteria, such as Akkermansia and Dorea, and higher levels of healthy flora, such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium.

Chocolate May Promote Friendly Gut Bacteria and Reduce Inflammation

Several studies demonstrate that cocoa increases the number friendly gut bacteria and reduce inflammation in the intestine.friendly gut bacteria

A team of scientists from the Department of Food and Nutritional Science at the University of Reading, UK, measured higher levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species in the intestines of human volunteers who drank chocolate milk for 4 weeks.

Previously, this team demonstrated that components in cocoa can reduce the growth of Clostridium histoluticum bacteria, that are found in the guts of those people who suffer from bowel disease.

Unsweetened cocoa powder or dark chocolate with the high content of cocoa are the closest options to the cocoa used in these studies.