Sleep Apnea Connected to the Higher Risk of Dementia

A recent research, published in the European Respiratory Journal, finds that sleep apnea, a common disorder that interferes with the breathing while sleeping, is connected to the changes in brain structure similar to changes seen in early dementia.sleep apnea increases the risk of dementia

For the study, 83 participants were involved with the age from 51 to 88. They reported memory and mood problems to their doctors. None of them was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) They underwent memory tests and MRI brain scans.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists concluded that a low level of oxygen in blood during sleep was associated with the loss of thickness of the right and left temporal lobes of the brain. These brain structures play important role in memory processes and proved to be changed in dementia.

More information about Sleep Apnea and its symptoms you may find here.

Narcissistic Teens May Perform Better at School, a Study Says

According to the findings of a new study from Queen’s University Belfast, narcissistic teens may show better results at school.narcissistic teens may perform better at school

For the study, a lead researcher Kostas Papageorgiou and his colleagues recruited 340 teenage students from different high schools in Milan, Italy. Having assessed the received data, the scientists concluded that teens with higher levels of subclinical narcissism tend to be more mentally tough what leads to better performance at school.

Lead researchers Kostas Papageorgiou, a lecturer in developmental psychopathology at Queen’s University Belfast in the United Kingdom, says: “People who score high on subclinical narcissism may be at an advantage because their heightened sense of self-worth may mean they are motivated, assertive, and successful in certain contexts.”

Smoking and Diabetes May Promote Calcium Buildup in Brain

A new study from the Netherlands finds that smoking and diabetes are linked to the calcium buildup in the hippocampus, a part of the brain which is important for memory.smoking adds to developing of calcium buildup in brain

Within the tasks of the study, a team of scientists examined the multiplanar brain CT scans of approximately 2,000 people who attended a hospital memory clinic in the Netherlands between 2009 and 2015. The patients’ average age was 78, ranging from 45 to 96 years.

Having analyzed the received CT scans, the researchers concluded that 19% of the study participants had calcification in the hippocampus. Also, the older age, smoking, and diabetes were associated with the higher level of calcifications in the brain.

Lead study author Dr. Esther J. M. de Brouwer, from the Department of Geriatrics at the University Medical Center in Utrecht, says: “It is […] likely that smoking and diabetes are risk factors for hippocampal calcifications.”

9 Stroke Symptoms that Are Common for Younger Women

Women are more vulnerable to strokes than men due to hormones. Nicole Weinberg, M.D., a cardiologist from Providence Saint John’s Health Center in California explains: “Higher hormone levels, particularly estrogen, compromise the integrity of blood vessels. They affect how the vessels stretch and contract, which can make them more vulnerable to arterial dissection [tears] and blood clots.”stroke symptoms in younger women

Women taking birth control pills, illegal drugs or those who are smoking or pregnant are even at higher risk of a stroke. Stroke symptoms in younger women may differ from the stroke symptoms in older women or men. Here is the list of all stroke symptoms — those, common to all, and those that are only typical for younger women:

  1. Your face looks really off.
  2. Feeling clumsy and weak.
  3. It’s hard to speak.
  4. Fainting.
  5. Dizziness and nausea.
  6. Seizure.
  7. A really strong headache.
  8. Persistent incurable hiccups.
  9. Sudden, drastic, unexplained changes in your personality or mental state.

A New Study Linked Brain Cholesterol to Alzheimer’s Disease

A new study from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom finds that brain cholesterol is associated with the developing of Alzheimer’s disease.brain cholesterol leads to Alzheimer's

With the help of in vitro modeling in the laboratory, the scientists were able to see that cholesterol sped up the aggregation of amyloid beta molecules by 20. At the present moment, the build-up of amyloid beta proteins is believed to be crucial in developing the Alzheimer’s disease.

Lead researcher Michele Vendruscolo says: “The question for us now is not how to eliminate cholesterol from the brain, but about how to control cholesterol’s role in Alzheimer’s disease through the regulation of its interaction with amyloid beta.”