Biological Clock Gene May Protect from Breast Cancer

According to a new study, conducted by the Texas A&M University in College Station, a gene taking part in the regulation of biological clock may also protect from breast cancer.biological clock

In the course of study the scientists identified two genes, Bmal1 and Per2, produce a cancer-promoting protein when “jetlagged”. Therefore, this may explain also why people who work night shifts have the higher risk of developing cancer.

Professor Porter, the lead investigator, explains: “Per2 is functioning as a tumor suppressor gene associated with cell identity. Right now, we are investigating how our findings relate to humans. There are studies out there showing a relationship between decreased levels of Per2 and certain types of breast cancer, which are more invasive. So, we believe that there is a direct relationship.”

Body Fat, not Weight, Associated with Higher Risk of Breast Cancer

A new study, whose findings were presented at American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference, finds that women within a normal weight range may be under the greater risk of breast cancer if their levels of body fat are too high.body fat linked to breast cancer

For the study, a team of scientists analyzed data from 3,460 participants with a normal BMI (body mass index) with no previous diagnosis of breast cancer. The participants were followed up for about 16 years, and if the diagnosis of cancer was made, the participants were further assessed for estrogen receptor positivity.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists found that the women with normal BMI but a high level of body fat were almost twice more likely to develop breast cancer.

Study author Dr. Neil Iyengar of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City says: “Our findings show that the risk of invasive breast cancer is increased in postmenstrual women with normal BMI and higher levels of body fat, meaning that a large proportion of the population has an unrecognized risk of developing cancer.”

Study: Breast Cancer Can Return 15 Years after Successful Treatment

A new study, conducted by a team of researchers lead by Dr. Hongchao Pan of University of Oxford, has found that breast cancer can return after remaining dormant for 15 years after the successful treatment.breast cancer may return after successful treatment

For the study, the scientists analyzed data the progress of 63,000 women for 20 years. All of them had the most common form of breast cancer.

Lead researcher Dr. Hongchao Pan says: “It is remarkable that breast cancer can remain dormant for so long and then spread many years later, with this risk remaining the same year after year and still strongly related to the size of original cancer and whether it had spread to the (lymph) nodes.”

A Compound in Soy May Improve Breast Cancer Treatment

A new study from the University of Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, US, suggests that genistein, a compound found in soy, could protect a gene responsible for suppressing the development of cancerous tumors and therefore improve breast cancer treatment.breast cancer treatment

For the research, a team of scientists conducted in vitro experiments using cancer cells taken from human breast tumors. Having analyzed the received results, the scientists concluded that genistein, a soy isoflavone, may play a significant role in halting the development of breast cancer tumors.

Dr. Donato F. Romangolo, one of the lead authors of the study, says: “Lifetime intake of soy in Asian woman has been linked to reduced risk of breast cancer. Genistein is the predominant isoflavone found in soy and it may actually block DNA methylation.”

A Large Study Found 72 New Gene Variants of Breast Cancer

The world’s largest collective study on the genetics of breast cancer found 72 new gene variants that can be responsible for increasing the risk of developing the disease.new gene variations

For the study, more than 300 research groups were involved in the analysis of genetic data received from over 275,000 women from all around the globe. The scientists were able to identify 65 variations of genes that contributed to the development of cancer. Other 7 genes were identified specifically in association with breast cancers that lacked estrogen receptors.

Researcher Georgia Chenevix-Trench from the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute in Australia says: “We know that breast cancer is caused by complex interactions between these genetic variants and our environment, but these newly discovered markers bring the number of known variants associated with breast cancer to around 180.”