Early Risers Have Lower Risk to Develop Breast Cancer

Recent British research, presented at the National Cancer Research Institute annual conference in the UK, suggests that women who are early risers have lower chances to develop breast cancer.early risers have lower risk of breast cancer

To study the link between sleep habits and breast cancer, researchers analyzed two data banks with more than 409,000 women. The scientists concluded that early risers had a 40% lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to night owls.

Rebecca Richmond, a research fellow in the Cancer Research U.K. Integrative Cancer Epidemiology Program at the University of Bristol, says: “We would like to do further work to investigate the mechanisms underpinning these results, as the estimates obtained are based on questions related to morning or evening preference, rather than actually whether people get up earlier or later in the day.”

Scientist Created a “Supramolecule” Able to Defeat Cancer

Cancer has a double-edged strategy to get past the macrophages, the largest immune cells in the body. However, the scientists from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, US, might have found a way to outwit cancer cells.supramolecule that might be able to defeat cancer

A team of researchers developed a “supramolecule”, a chemical structure made of smaller molecules bond together similar to LEGO pieces. This molecule is able to block cancer cells’ specific signals. The researchers tested the supramolecule on mouse models with aggressive breast and skin cancer. The mice treated with the created molecule demonstrated complete inhibition of tumor growth and of formation of metastatic nodules.

Lead author of the study Ashish Kulkarni, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at University of Massachusetts, says: “Clinicians are increasingly realizing that one drug or one-size-fits-all approach is not enough when combating cancer and that a combination immunotherapy, such as blocking two distinct targets in the same immune cell, is the future of immunology. Our approach capitalizes on this concept.”

Scientists Explained How a Compound in Red Wine Prevents Cancer

A new study from Brazil demonstrates how resveratrol, the chemical compound in grapes and red wine, may have anticancer properties and prevent cancer, especially breast cancer.red-wine-compound-prevents-cancer

A team of researchers carried out immunofluorescence colocalization assays to test the efficacy of resveratrol on breast cancer cell lines that had different p53 mutations and on breast cancer cells with normal p53.

The tests showed that resveratrol inhibited the aggregation of p53 in both human breast cancer cells and in the rodents’ tumors.

The authors of the study conclude: “This study provides evidence that resveratrol directly modulates p53 and enhances our understanding of the mechanisms involved in p53 aggregation as a therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Our data indicate that resveratrol is a highly promising lead compound targeted against mutant p53 aggregation.”

Biological Clock Gene May Protect from Breast Cancer

According to a new study, conducted by the Texas A&M University in College Station, a gene taking part in the regulation of biological clock may also protect from breast cancer.biological clock

In the course of study the scientists identified two genes, Bmal1 and Per2, produce a cancer-promoting protein when “jetlagged”. Therefore, this may explain also why people who work night shifts have the higher risk of developing cancer.

Professor Porter, the lead investigator, explains: “Per2 is functioning as a tumor suppressor gene associated with cell identity. Right now, we are investigating how our findings relate to humans. There are studies out there showing a relationship between decreased levels of Per2 and certain types of breast cancer, which are more invasive. So, we believe that there is a direct relationship.”

Body Fat, not Weight, Associated with Higher Risk of Breast Cancer

A new study, whose findings were presented at American Association for Cancer Research Special Conference, finds that women within a normal weight range may be under the greater risk of breast cancer if their levels of body fat are too high.body fat linked to breast cancer

For the study, a team of scientists analyzed data from 3,460 participants with a normal BMI (body mass index) with no previous diagnosis of breast cancer. The participants were followed up for about 16 years, and if the diagnosis of cancer was made, the participants were further assessed for estrogen receptor positivity.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists found that the women with normal BMI but a high level of body fat were almost twice more likely to develop breast cancer.

Study author Dr. Neil Iyengar of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City says: “Our findings show that the risk of invasive breast cancer is increased in postmenstrual women with normal BMI and higher levels of body fat, meaning that a large proportion of the population has an unrecognized risk of developing cancer.”