A Compound in Broccoli Can Be the Key to Combating Ageing

Broccoli is rich in indoles, chemicals that kept mice fit as they get older. Previously, this team of scientists led by Professor Kalman of Emory University in Atlanta, USA, identified that indoles helped worms and mice resist infection and disease.combating ageing

For the study, the researchers treated mice with antibiotics to eliminate existing flora. After that, they colonized mice with either normal E. coli or bacteria that cannot produce it. In mice aged 28 months, indole helped animals maintain their weight, mobility, and activity levels.

Professor Kalman says: “It’s like the Picture of Dorian Gray in terms of the genes involved. Indoles make old animals look more like the young ones.”

A Compound in Broccoli Can Kill Deadly Melanoma Cells

An international team of researchers, led by Penn State College of Medicine, US, developed a compound similar to one found in broccoli and cauliflower and other vegetables of cabbage group able to kill tumors in melanoma.broccoli can kill melanoma cells

Researchers suggest that this compound can block the hypoxia-inducible factor protein helping tumors grow. In order to improve effectiveness, the scientists modified the drug by replacing the sulfur in a compound they tested before with selenium. They also varied the length of the chemical chain.

Dr. Arun Sharma says: “There are a lot of recommendations that, for example, broccoli can reduce your chances of getting cancer. Those are OK recommendations for prevention, but the compounds in the vegetables alone may not be potent enough to be used in a therapeutic environment.”

Scientists Proved Why Broccoli Is Really a Superfood

According to a recent study, broccoli can lower the risk of coronary heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and even several types of cancer. Flavonoids found in this food can help the body to response to diseases, scientists suggest.broccoli

Eating broccoli once per three days can improve the immune system by aiding inflammation.

“Phenolic compounds have good antioxidant activity, and there is increasing evidence that this activity affects biochemical pathways affiliated with inflammation in mammals,” says Dr. Jack Juvik, a geneticist from the University of Illinois. “We need inflammation because it’s a response to the disease or damage, but it’s also associated with initiation of a number of diseases. People whose diets consist of a certain level of these compounds will have a lesser risk of contracting these diseases.”

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