A Protein in Milk May Ease Taste and Smell Disorders in Cancer Patients

A new study, published in the journal Food & Function, suggests that lactoferrin, a protein found in milk, could be used as a treatment of taste and smell disorders in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.lactoferrin may ease taste and smell disorders in cancer patiens

Previously, a team of researchers identified the role of lactoferrin in diminishing the metallic flavor stimulated by chemotherapy medications. The substance is well-known as a first-line defense, aiding the body’s immune response, but its ability to impact salivary proteins stays little-studied. The most recent study builds on the previous body of work through the application of lactoferrin supplements in treating taste and smell abnormalities.

Researcher Susan Duncan says: “By suggesting lactoferrin as a dietary supplement, we can reduce taste and smell abnormalities (TSA) for many patients, restoring their ability to enjoy foods during a time in which nutrition can play a key role in their recovery. This research could help us develop TSA-targeted biomarkers and strategies for improving the quality of life during chemotherapy. Cancer patients and their supporting family and friends may again find comfort in enjoying a meal together.”

Kale, Cabbage, and Broccoli May Protect Against Bowel Cancer

A new study finds that in the process of digestion of such green vegetables as kale, cabbage, and broccoli a protein, known as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), is activated that reduces gut inflammation and prevents the colon form of cancer.green vegetables prevent bowel cancer

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed genetically modified mice that were not able to produce or activate AhR in their intestines. These rodents developed gut inflammation that led to bowel cancer, while those animals who were fed with green vegetables didn’t develop gut inflammation.

Lead author of the study Dr. Amina Metidji says: “Interestingly when mice whose cancer was already developing were switched to the [green vegetable]-enriched diet, they ended up with significantly fewer tumors which were also more benign. It’s not just fiber in vegetables that reduces the risk of bowel cancer.”

Raised Sensitivity to Bitter Tastes Connected to Higher Risk of Cancer

Raised sensitivity to bitter tastes might be an indicator of higher risk of cancer in women, according to a new research, conducted by scientists at the College of Agriculture Sciences of Pennsylvania State University in State College (US) in association with a team of researchers from Leeds University (UK).raised sensitivity to bitter tastes

For the study, the researchers collected data via the UK Women’s Cohort Study, founded in 1995 by scientists at Leeds University. The researchers split women into 3 groups according to their sensitivity to bitterness: “super-tasters”, “tasters,” and “non-tasters.” The analysis of the received data showed that “super-tasters” and “tasters” were at higher risk of cancer than those who couldn’t taste bitterness.

Lead researcher Joshua Lambert explains: “The difference in cancer incidence between the women with the highest bitter-taste sensitivity and those with the lowest was striking. Super-tasters had about a 58 percent higher risk of cancer incidence and the tasters had about a 40 percent higher risk of developing cancer, compared to women who were classified as non-tasters.”

Scientist Created a “Supramolecule” Able to Defeat Cancer

Cancer has a double-edged strategy to get past the macrophages, the largest immune cells in the body. However, the scientists from the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, US, might have found a way to outwit cancer cells.supramolecule that might be able to defeat cancer

A team of researchers developed a “supramolecule”, a chemical structure made of smaller molecules bond together similar to LEGO pieces. This molecule is able to block cancer cells’ specific signals. The researchers tested the supramolecule on mouse models with aggressive breast and skin cancer. The mice treated with the created molecule demonstrated complete inhibition of tumor growth and of formation of metastatic nodules.

Lead author of the study Ashish Kulkarni, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at University of Massachusetts, says: “Clinicians are increasingly realizing that one drug or one-size-fits-all approach is not enough when combating cancer and that a combination immunotherapy, such as blocking two distinct targets in the same immune cell, is the future of immunology. Our approach capitalizes on this concept.”

Scientists Explained How a Compound in Red Wine Prevents Cancer

A new study from Brazil demonstrates how resveratrol, the chemical compound in grapes and red wine, may have anticancer properties and prevent cancer, especially breast cancer.red-wine-compound-prevents-cancer

A team of researchers carried out immunofluorescence colocalization assays to test the efficacy of resveratrol on breast cancer cell lines that had different p53 mutations and on breast cancer cells with normal p53.

The tests showed that resveratrol inhibited the aggregation of p53 in both human breast cancer cells and in the rodents’ tumors.

The authors of the study conclude: “This study provides evidence that resveratrol directly modulates p53 and enhances our understanding of the mechanisms involved in p53 aggregation as a therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. Our data indicate that resveratrol is a highly promising lead compound targeted against mutant p53 aggregation.”