Starting Meal with Yogurt Could Reduce Inflammation

A new study, conducted by the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, US, suggests that starting your meal with a serving of yogurt may reduce inflammation, protect from the harmful byproducts of gut bacteria.yogurt may reduce inflammation

To examine their suggestion, the researchers recruited 120 premenopausal women, half of them were obese, for the first experiment. Half of the participants had to eat 12 ounces of low-fat yogurt each day for 9 weeks while others ate non-diary pudding. The results showed that some inflammatory markers, such as TNF-alpha, were significantly reduced in those participants who ate yogurt.

Ruisong Pei, a postdoctoral researcher, says: “Eating 8 ounces of low-fat yogurt before a meal is a feasible strategy to improve post-meal metabolism and thus may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases.”

New Study Proves that You Can Die from a Broken Heart

A recent research, published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, finds that in the three-month period after a spouse’s death widows and widowers are at higher risk of death associated with cardiovascular disease.broken heart

The study found that people who have lost a spouse within the last three months have higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (immune markers indicating inflammation in the bloodstream) and lower heart rate variability (HRV) than those non-bereaved individuals of the same sex, age, body mass index, and education level.

Lead author Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, USA, says: “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41% increased risk of mortality. Importantly, 53% of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular disease. This study is an important step toward understanding why this is the case by identifying how bereavement gets under the skin to promote morbidity and mortality.”

Adding Lentils to Meals May Help Fight High Blood Pressure

According to a recent research from the University of Manitoba, lentils in your meal may successfully fight high blood pressure, scientifically called hypertension.

The researchers also found that eating lentils can reverse declines in blood vessel health. The results of the study were presented at the annual conference of the American Heart Association, held in Dallas, USA.

Dr. Peter Zahradka, one of the lead authors of the two experiments on the effects of lentils, believes that the results are amazing. He also adds: “[The results] provide a non-pharmacological way of treating diseases associated with blood vessel dysfunction.”

Restless Legs Syndrome Increases Risk of Heart-Related Death

A new research, published in the journal Neurology, finds that the restless legs syndrome (RLS), the sleep and sensorimotor disorder, may increase the risk of heart-related death, especially in senior women.restless legs syndrome

For the study, a team of scientists examined data on 57,417 women from the Nurses’ Health Study. The women were clinically followed for a period of 10 years. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers concluded that over the 10-years period women with restless legs syndrome were 43% more likely to die from a heart disease.

The lead author of the research Xiang Gao, an associate professor of nutritional sciences at Pennsylvania State University in State College, says: “People with RLS are at elevated risk of CVD and other chronic conditions, but previous studies of all-cause mortality in people with RLS have reported inconsistent results. Our research clarifies how restless leg[s] syndrome affects cardiovascular disease-related mortality in older women, specifically. This study suggests that RLS could be a novel risk factor for CVD-related death.”

Having a Dog May Reduce Your Risk of All-Cause Death

According to a study, conducted by the scientists from Uppsala University, Sweden, dogs may considerably reduce our risk of premature death.dogs reduce the risk of all-cause death

For the study, a team of scientists analyzed the data received from more than 3.4 million adults and found that people in multi-person and single-person households who owned a dog had 11% and 33% lower risk of all-cause death respectively than those without dogs.

The researchers conclude in their study: “Taken together, we believe our longitudinal population-wide design provides the most robust evidence so far of a link between dog ownership and health outcomes, although bias from reverse causation, misclassification, and confounding cannot be excluded.”