Low Intake of Fruits and Vegetables Increases the Risk of Death from Heart Disease

According to a new study, presented at Nutrition 2019, the American Society for Nutrition annual meeting in Baltimore, US, low consumption of fruits and vegetables may become the cause for 1 in 7 deaths and 1 in 12 deaths, correspondingly, from heart disease.Low Intake of Fruits and Vegetables Increases the Risk of Death from Heart Disease

A team of researchers analyzed the available data, the scientists found that low consumption of fruit was connected to approximately 2 million deaths from heart disease, and low consumption of vegetables was associated with 1 million deaths, on a global level.

Senior study author Dariush Mozaffarian, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy says: “These findings indicate a need to expand the focus to increasing availability and consumption of protective foods like fruits, vegetables, and legumes — a positive message with tremendous potential for improving global health.”

A Simple Blood Test May Predict the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

According to recent research from the US, a simple blood test currently used for diagnostics of heart attacks can be also used to predict the risk of cardiovascular disease.simple blood test may predict cardiovascular disease

Scientists analyzed a group of 8,121 people aged 54–74 who took part in the study of Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities. None of the participants previously has been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease.

The lead study author Dr. Christie Ballantyne, the cardiology chief at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, says: “If the first time you find out that you’re at risk for heart failure is when you actually start getting short of breath and you end up in the hospital, you probably have advanced heart disease already, and it is going to be harder to treat than if that person took steps years earlier.”

PTSD Connected to the Development of Cardiovascular Disease

A large study from Sweden finds a connection between psychiatric conditions after stressful experiences such as PTSD and acute stress and the risk of development of cardiovascular disease.ptsd connected to cardiovascular disease

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from the Swedish National Patient Register on 136,637 patients collected between 1987 and 2013. Patients were diagnosed with stress-related disorders such as PTSD, acute stress reaction, adjustment disorder, and other stress reactions.

The analysis showed that people with a stress-related illness were 64 percent more likely to develop a form of cardiovascular disease in the 12 months after a psychiatric diagnosis compared their unexposed siblings.

The authors of the study write in their paper: “These findings call for enhanced clinical awareness and, if verified, monitoring or early intervention among patients with recently diagnosed stress-related disorders.”

Having a Midday Nap Can Support Lowering Blood Pressure

A new study from the Asklepieion General Hospital in Voula, Greece, suggests that having a midday nap is not only good for boosting your energy but also can lower high blood pressure.midday nap cuts high blood pressure

For the study, the researchers examined 212 people with the mean blood pressure of 129.9 mm Hg. The participants’ average age was 62 years. During the study, the analysis showed that people who took a midday nap experienced 5.3 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure.

One of the study researchers, Dr. Manolis Kallistratos says: “These findings are important because a drop in blood pressure as small as 2 mm Hg can reduce the risk of cardiovascular events, such as heart attack by up to 10 percent.”

Men Who Can Do 40 Push-Ups Have Lower Risk of Heart Disease

Men Who Can Do 40 Push-Ups Have Lower Risk of Heart Disease

A new study from the US suggests that middle-aged men who are able to do 40 push-ups and more in one session have lower risk of cardiovascular disease than men who can do fewer than 10 push-ups.

For a retrospective longitudinal study from 2000 to 2010, 1,104 firefighters from Indiana whose age was over 18 years were included. Their average age was 39.6 years and average body mass index 28.7.

First author of the study Dr. Justin Yang, an occupational medicine resident at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health in Boston, comments: “Our findings provide evidence that push-up capacity could be an easy, no-cost method to help assess cardiovascular disease risk in almost any setting.”

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