Four Cups of Coffee Daily Might Protect Cells of the Heart

Scientists from Heinrich-Heine-University and the IUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine in Düsseldorf, Germany, suggest that consuming the amount of caffeine equivalent to four cups of coffee might be enough to protect the cells of the heart.four cups of coffee protect heart

In the study, the scientists discovered a new enzyme within mitochondria appearing to be relevant to caffeine’s protecting effect: p27. Using the mice models, the researchers found that caffeine protected against heart damage in prediabetic, older, and obese mice.

Lead researchers Judith Haendeler concludes: “These results should lead to better strategies for protecting heart muscle from damage, including consideration of coffee consumption or caffeine as an additional dietary factor in the elderly population.”

Being Married May Cut the Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

According to a recent analysis of existing studies in the UK, single, divorced and widowed people have higher chances to develop heart disease and stroke. That’s why the authors of the study believe that being married can be another factor that cuts the risk of cardiovascular disease.being married cuts the risk of heart disease

For the study, a team of researchers examined 34 studies from around the world which included over 2 million participants altogether aged from 42 to 77. The results of the analysis showed that single, divorced or widowed people had 42% higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease compared to married participants.

Lead study author Chun Wai Wong and colleagues conclude: “Future research should focus around whether marital status is a surrogate marker for other adverse health behavior or cardiovascular risk profiles that underlines our reported findings or whether marital status should be considered as a risk factor by itself.”

High Salt Consumption May Destroy Certain Gut Bacteria

High salt consumption may destroy a certain type of gut bacteria and this could be a reason for a high blood pressure, according to a new study, led by the scientists from the Experimental and Clinical Research Center and Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, Germany.high salt consumption adds to high blood pressure

In the course of the research, a team of researchers discovered that a version of Lactobacillus, a type of gut bacteria found in fermented food, is destroyed when they are fed a high-salt food. This food also was a reason for the high blood pressure in mice.

Lead researcher of the study Prof. Dominik N. Müller says: “We should start to see our gut microbiome as a viable target for treating conditions that we know are aggravated by salt, such as high blood pressure and inflammation.”

Starting Meal with Yogurt Could Reduce Inflammation

A new study, conducted by the researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, US, suggests that starting your meal with a serving of yogurt may reduce inflammation, protect from the harmful byproducts of gut bacteria.yogurt may reduce inflammation

To examine their suggestion, the researchers recruited 120 premenopausal women, half of them were obese, for the first experiment. Half of the participants had to eat 12 ounces of low-fat yogurt each day for 9 weeks while others ate non-diary pudding. The results showed that some inflammatory markers, such as TNF-alpha, were significantly reduced in those participants who ate yogurt.

Ruisong Pei, a postdoctoral researcher, says: “Eating 8 ounces of low-fat yogurt before a meal is a feasible strategy to improve post-meal metabolism and thus may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic diseases.”

New Study Proves that You Can Die from a Broken Heart

A recent research, published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, finds that in the three-month period after a spouse’s death widows and widowers are at higher risk of death associated with cardiovascular disease.broken heart

The study found that people who have lost a spouse within the last three months have higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (immune markers indicating inflammation in the bloodstream) and lower heart rate variability (HRV) than those non-bereaved individuals of the same sex, age, body mass index, and education level.

Lead author Chris Fagundes, an assistant professor of psychology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, USA, says: “In the first six months after the loss of a spouse, widows/widowers are at a 41% increased risk of mortality. Importantly, 53% of this increased risk is due to cardiovascular disease. This study is an important step toward understanding why this is the case by identifying how bereavement gets under the skin to promote morbidity and mortality.”