Leafy Greens and Whole Grains Help Lower the Risk of Heart Failure

A new research from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, US, finds that those individuals that consume mostly vegetables and fruits have a significantly lower risk of developing heart failure.leafy greens may help decrease the risk of heart failure

For the research, a team of scientists analyzed the medical data from 15,569 participants in the study called Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke that included both white and black adults from the US aged from 45 and more.

First study author Dr. Kyla Lara says: “Eating a diet mostly of dark green leafy plants, fruits, beans, whole grains, and fish, while limiting processed meats, saturated fats, trans fats, refined carbohydrates, and foods high in added sugars is a heart-healthy lifestyle and may specifically help prevent heart failure if you don’t already have it.”

Every Extra Cup of Coffee Boosts Your Longevity by 8%

A new research from the University of Colorado, published by the American Heart Association, finds that every extra cup of coffee is enough to decrease the risk of stroke by 8% and heart failure by 7%.extra cup of coffee boosts heart health

For the study, a team of scientists used a machine to analyzed data from the long-running Framlingham Heart study, which has investigated cardiovascular disease for more than sixty years.

Laura Stevens, the first author of the study, says: “The association between drinking coffee and a decreased risk of heart failure and stroke was consistently noted in all three studies. The work showed that each additional cup per day had an associated decrease in each outcome.”

Common Chemicals Found in Plastics Associated with Chronic Diseases

A team of researchers from Australia has recently analyzed some common chemicals found in plastics and discovered a link between higher levels of these chemicals in urine and rise in heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension in men.chemicals in plastics may lead to chronic diseases

The researchers analyzed total phthalate exposure among 1,500 Australian men. They detected phthalates in 99.6% of men aged 35 and older. After that, levels of the chemicals in each person were then connected to the chronic diseases.

The lead researchers Zumin Shi, associate professor at the University of Adelaide’s Medical School, says: “We found that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and high blood pressure increased among those men with higher total phthalate level.”

Researchers Linked the Risk of Heart Disease to Air Pollution

A team of researchers in their early study suggests that the particles of pollution can build up in blood vessels and increase the risk of developing heart disease.air pollution linked to heart disease

The scientists believe that the reason can be that extremely small particles can penetrate the blood system.

To investigate this, the scientists from the University of Edinburgh, UK, and universities in the Netherlands studied nanoparticles of inert that believed to be too small to be removed by the natural body’s filter system in the nose and lungs.

They asked 14 volunteers to breathe in air containing these nanoparticles while working out for 2 hours. The day after, the researchers discovered the gold nanoparticles in the bloodstream of most participants.

Diet Soda Connected to the Higher Risk of Stroke and Dementia

A new study, executed by the team of researchers from Boston University School of Medicine, associated drinking diet soda on a daily basis to both stroke and dementia.diet soda linked to the risk of stroke and dementia

The research tracked 2,888 persons aged 45 and over for the development of a stroke and 1,484 participants aged 60 and over for dementia within a 10-year period. Having analyzed the received results, the study concluded that those who reported drinking at least 1 artificially sweetened drink every day, compared to less than 1 weekly, were 2.96 times more likely to have an ischemic stroke, and 2.89 times more likely to develop dementia.

Christopher Gardner, director of Nutrition Studies at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, says: “… the bottom line is, ‘Have more water and have less diet soda.’ And don’t switch to real soda.”