A Large-Scale Study Confirms the Cardiovascular Benefits of Walnuts

A large-scale review of clinical trials for the past 25 years confirms that walnuts are the great choice for people who want to support their cardiovascular health.cardiovascular benefits of walnuts

The scientists reviewed 26 randomized studies with 1,059 participants in total whose age was from 22 to 75. The benefits of a diet rich in walnuts were compared to low-fat, Western, Mediterranean, and Japanese diets.

The analysis showed that a diet rich in walnuts had 3.25% greater reduction in total cholesterol levels, 3.73% greater decrease in LDL cholesterol, and 5.52% greater reduction of triglycerides.

Dr. Michael Roizen, the chief wellness officer in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, says: “This updated review further strengthens the case that enjoying walnuts is a great (and tasty) way to add important nutrients to your diet while supporting the health of your heart.”

High Salt Consumption May Destroy Certain Gut Bacteria

High salt consumption may destroy a certain type of gut bacteria and this could be a reason for a high blood pressure, according to a new study, led by the scientists from the Experimental and Clinical Research Center and Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, Germany.high salt consumption adds to high blood pressure

In the course of the research, a team of researchers discovered that a version of Lactobacillus, a type of gut bacteria found in fermented food, is destroyed when they are fed a high-salt food. This food also was a reason for the high blood pressure in mice.

Lead researcher of the study Prof. Dominik N. Müller says: “We should start to see our gut microbiome as a viable target for treating conditions that we know are aggravated by salt, such as high blood pressure and inflammation.”

Regular Exercising May Keep Your Heart and Main Arteries Young

According to a recent study, published in The Journal of Physiology, exercising four to five times per week may help stop the main arteries to the heart from stiffening up.exercising may keep main arteries young

The researchers from the US have found that those who exercise four to five times per week had healthier large central arteries and healthier middle-sized ones.

Lead author of the study Dr. Benjamin Levine of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine in Dallas, USA, explains: “This work is really exciting because it enables us to develop exercise programs to keep the heart youthful and even turn back time on older hearts and blood vessels.”

16 Foods That Are the Best for Your Heart Health, According to Experts

It is well known that our overall health and wellbeing are totally dependable on what we eat. That is why a healthy diet plays a significant role in keeping the body healthy. Day after day, scientists all over the world make new discoveries proving that certain products may be beneficial for certain systems of our body.food for your heart health

The health experts from the US highlighted 16 foods, when included in a well-balanced healthy diet, might help maintain your heart health. Here are the best foods to consume regularly:

  1. Asparagus.
  2. Beans, peas, chickpeas, and lentils.
  3. Berries.
  4. Broccoli.
  5. Chia seeds and flaxseeds.
  6. Dark chocolate.
  7. Coffee.
  8. Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids.
  9. Green tea.
  10. Nuts.
  11. Liver.
  12. Oatmeal.
  13. Red wine.
  14. Tomatoes.
  15. Spinach.
  16. Vegetables.

A Handful of Pecans a Day May Improve Your Heart Health

The latest research, published in the journal Nutrients, explained how pecans may improve heart health and described the numerous benefits of consuming this nut. The study was executed by the team of scientists at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University in Medford.handful-pecans-improve-heart-health

For their study, the researchers recruited 26 men and women, who were overweight or obese but otherwise healthy. The participants spent 4 weeks on one diet and then switched to another diet for the remaining 4 weeks. One of the diets was a control diet where 15% of the total calorie count were pecans. The researchers found that adding pecans to the participants’ diets improved insulin sensitivity.

Lead researcher Diane McKay, Ph.D., explains: “Pecans are naturally high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, so replacing a portion of the saturated fat in the diet with these healthier fats can explain some of the cardioprotective effect we observed.”