Protect Your Pet from the Flu: 4 Easy to Follow Tips

If you have a pet, you know how it’s hard to watch when your lovely one suffers from some disease. Believe it or not, but pets can easily get a flu, just like you and it is as common as between people.

One recent study in Ohio found 30 percent of cats had been infected with the flu virus. The symptoms are the same as the ones humans face: breathing difficulty, runny nose and fatigue.

Very often we can be the one who bring flu to our pets. Here are 4 short tips to protect your pets from getting sick.

  1. Wash you hands
    Remember that you are the one who can transmit a flu to your pet, so it depends on you how healthy your cat or dog is.
  2. Cover your mouth when coughing
    Do not think that our viruses cannot be cathed by your pet. It’s a mistake because they easily can get a flu from their owners.
  3. Update your pet’s vaccines
    It is important to prevent diseases in time and your vet will be able to help you.
  4. Get a flu shot

Don’t forget that pets can get viruses from other pets, so be sure that your pet’s friends are healthy and have all needed vaccines.

Aggression Outbreaks are Associated with Cats

The reason for the sudden angry outbursts, unmotivated violence and aggressive behavior on the road can be a parasite carried by cats. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry found a link between toxoplasmosis and intermittent explosive disorder.

Toxoplasmosis is transmitted to humans through the feces of infected cats, food or contaminated water. The WHO estimates that 30% of people are carriers of this infection.

Our research shows that latent toxoplasmosis can change the chemistry of the brain and increase the risk of aggressive behavior, – says senior study author Ellen Manning, head of the department of psychiatry and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago.

Scientists studied 358 adults with a diagnosis of IED, depression and other mental disorders. Blood tests of participants showed that people who suffer from the explosive disorder, more than 2 times often found themselves infected with Toxoplasma (22% vs. 9% of healthy people in the control group).

The authors acknowledged the link between infection and the IED but warned that for the determination of causality further research is needed.

Dr. Royce Lee, co-author of the study explained that the observed correlation is certainly not a call to get rid of your cats. We do not yet understand the mechanism of connection: aggressive outbursts may be a consequence of inflammation or direct destruction of the brain by a parasite. Perhaps more of aggressive people simply have cats or eat undercooked meat.

Now scientists have to learn how the cure of latent toxoplasmosis will reduce the aggressiveness of people with the intermittent explosive disorder.