Sleep Position in Late Pregnancy Associated with High Risk of Stillbirth

A new research from the UK has discovered a link between the higher risk of stillbirth and a common sleep position adding to the growing body of evidence that mothers to be should try sleeping on side during the last trimester.stillbirth

For the research, a team of scientists interviewed 1024 women from 41 maternity hospitals across the UK and found that 291 of them had a stillbirth late in pregnancy.

Lead study author Alexander Heazell, an obstetrician at Tommy’s Stillbirth Research Centre, University of Manchester, says: “Stillbirth is devastating, with long-lasting effects on bereaved parents. Parents want to know why their baby has died, whether it might happen again if they try for another baby and what they can do to avoid further stillbirth. We believe that identifying, and avoiding, risk factors that are strongly associated with stillbirth will reduce the number of babies who are stillborn.”

Living with Mother-in-Law May Affect the Number of Kids a Woman Has

According to a recent study, executed by the scientists from the University of Vienna in Austria, living in the same household with a woman’s mother or mother-in-law may lower the number of children the woman has.kids

For the study, the researchers examined the medical records of over 2.5 million women from 14 countries from all around the world. These countries included Pakistan, Iraq, Zambia, Romania, Brazil, the United States among others.

The authors of the study conclude: “In three-generation households, grandparents are not only providers of support but can also be resource competitors, and this may be a particularly suitable explanation given that the study included many developing countries.”

Risk of Developing Postpartum Depression Might Be Influenced by Season

According to a new study, presented at the Anesthesiology annual meeting, USA, the risk of developing postpartum depression can be influenced by the season in which the birth of a child is happening.postpartum depression

For the study, a team of the scientists analyzed the medical records of 20,169 who gave birth between June 2015 and August 2017 and found that 817 women in total developed postpartum depression. The analysis showed that the risk of the depression was lower in women who gave birth in spring or winter, compared to the women who gave birth in autumn or summer.

The scientists suppose that this may happen due to the poorer weather conditions in winter and spring what can encourage more indoor activities with a newborn baby.