Childhood Experiences Can Change Your DNA for the Rest of Life

A new research from Northwestern University, USA, suggests that experiences in childhood can influence DNA and alter it for the rest of human’s life.Childhood Experiences

A team of researchers analyzed over hundred genes associated with inflammation, looking for hints of epigenetic changes, changes that can be influenced by everything we do from how we sleep to how wealthy we are.

One of the more prominent forms of these epigenetic processes is methylation, one of nine of those genes was found to have a close relationship with a number of childhood variables including household socioeconomic status in childhood, extended absence of a parent in childhood, and even whether the person was born in the dry season.

In the future, this study could help explain the prevalence of cardiovascular and certain inflammatory diseases in specific communities.

Breastfeeding Doesn’t Make Children Smarter, Study Says

A new study, published in the journal Pediatrics, says that breastfeeding has no influence on a child’s cognitive development.breastfeeding does not make your baby smart

During the research, a team of scientists from University College Dublin studied 8,000 Irish families and tested the children were breastfed and who were not at ages three and five. They found that those kids who were breastfed for at least 6 months are less hyperactive by age 3 than kids who were not breastfed, but this difference disappears by the age of 5 years.

Study author Lisa-Christine Girard, a researcher at University College Dublin, explains: “We weren’t able to find a direct causal link between breastfeeding and children’s cognitive outcomes.”

Time Management Issues Linked to Freewheeling Home Life in Childhood

Having problems with time management might be connected to a freewheeling, unpredictable daily home routine in childhood, a new study from the University of Albany suggests.time management

Psychologists asked 292 undergraduate students to assess the level of regularity of a variety of activities and routines in their childhood. These activities included meals, extracurricular activities, sleeping habits and time spent with friends and family.

After having analysed the answers, scientists found that the students who had more consistency in their daily routines in childhood tended to have fewer problems with attention and time management.

Dr. Jennifer Malatras, a psychologist at the University of Albany and the lead author of the study, says: “This study is part of broader line of research exploring the relationship between the stability of the family environment and adjustment in children, adolescents and emerging adults.”

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