Having a Close Relative with Alzheimer’s Disease May Impair Cognition

According to recent research from the Translational Genomics Research Institute, US, having a close relative with Alzheimer’s disease may affect cognition and learning.Having a Close Relative with Alzheimer’s Disease May Impair Cognition

During the study, the total amount of 59,571 participants completed online questionnaires including questions about their sex, educational level, age, language, country, overall health, and family history of the Alzheimer’s disease.

After the participants answered all the necessary questions, they were asked to memorize 12-word pairs. After that, they had to retest their memory with the new pairs of words filling in the matching words missing.

The analysis of the collected data showed that people with a close relative with the condition (a parent or a sibling) matched 2.5 fewer word pairs compared to people without a family history of the condition.

When There Is Too Much Information, You Listen Better with Right Ear

A new study from Auburn University in Alabama suggests that when there’s a lot of information going into the brain, the brain is straining with the load, so the humans depend more on the right ear for processing and keeping the incoming information.better listen with the right ear

Forty-one adults aged between 19 and 28 participated in the study. They took part in a number of both separation and integration dichotic listening tests. With each subsequent test, the amount of information increased.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists concluded that when there was no too much of information, the participant retained information fed into their both ears well, but when the amount of information increased, their ability to remember items heard by the right ear was greater than the items heard by the left ear. The average difference was 8% but some persons had the difference up to 40%.

Breastfeeding Doesn’t Make Children Smarter, Study Says

A new study, published in the journal Pediatrics, says that breastfeeding has no influence on a child’s cognitive development.breastfeeding does not make your baby smart

During the research, a team of scientists from University College Dublin studied 8,000 Irish families and tested the children were breastfed and who were not at ages three and five. They found that those kids who were breastfed for at least 6 months are less hyperactive by age 3 than kids who were not breastfed, but this difference disappears by the age of 5 years.

Study author Lisa-Christine Girard, a researcher at University College Dublin, explains: “We weren’t able to find a direct causal link between breastfeeding and children’s cognitive outcomes.”

Having Eggs for Breakfast Can Boost Your Brain Functions

A new Finnish research found that eating eggs have only a slight effect on blood cholesterol levels. Moreover, this research claims that eating eggs may actually help boost your brain functions.brain functions

For their study, a team of researchers analysed the diets of 2,497 men aged from 42 to 60 who didn’t have the diagnosis of a memory disorder. Over a period of 22 years, 337 had gone onto developing a neurological condition.

Professor Jyrki Virtanen, an author of the study from the University of Eastern Finland says: “Neither cholesterol nor egg intake was associated with a higher risk of incident or Alzheimer’s disease. However, egg intake was associated with better performance on neuropsychological tests of the frontal lobe and executive functioning.”

More information about the study you can find here.

Aerobic Exercise Can Improve Cognition in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment

A new study confirms that aerobic exercise not only increases brain size (as previous research suggested), but also can improve cognition in senior patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI).mild cognitive impairment

For the study, the researchers examined 35 adults with MCI. The participants were divided in two groups: one group included 16 adults with average age 63, another group was a control group including 19 adults with average age 67.

The first group performed a range of aerobic activities such as treadmill, cycling, and elliptical training. They had training sessions 4 times a week during 6 months. The control group performed stretching exercises with the same schedule.

At the end of the 6-months period, the scientists found that those who performed aerobic exercising had improved more significantly compared to the stretching group.

More information about the study is here.