Cheap Drugs May Help Prevent Dementia after a Stroke

A new research from the University of Edinburgh, UK, suggests that cheap cilostazol tablets may reduce damage to arteries, which lead to blood clots, resulting in strokes and cognitive decline.cheap drugs may reduce risk of dementia

The researchers plan to assess the medications’ ability to cut the risk of lacunar strokes and dementia within the next three years.

Dr. Doug Brown from the Alzheimer’s Society says: “With no new dementia drug in 15 years – but one person every three minutes developing it – the race is on to find desperately needed drugs that can prevent people getting dementia. Finding an existing drug which can prevent dementia would be a huge breakthrough.”

More Evidence Found for Link between Sugar and Alzheimer’s Disease

A recent research suggests that people with high blood sugar experience worse long-term cognitive decline compared to their peers with the normal level of blood sugar.sugar linked to Alzherimers

For their study, a team of researchers tracked 5,189 participants, including 55% women, whose average age was 66 years. They analyzed their level of cognitive function between 2004–2005 and 2014–2015. Over time, the scientists monitored levels of HbA1c, or glycated hemoglobin, a measure of blood sugar control.

The analysis of the received data showed that participants with greater levels of HbA1c experienced much higher rate of decline.

The researchers, led by epidemiologist Wuxiang Xie from Imperial College London, explain in their paper: “Our findings suggest that interventions that delay diabetes onset, as well as management strategies for blood sugar control, might help alleviate the progression of subsequent decline over the long-term.”

Drinking Tea May Ward Off Cognitive Decline in Senior Adults

Recently, the researchers discovered that drinking tea on a regular basis can more than halve the risk of cognitive decline in senior adults, especially in those with a genetic risk of the Alzheimer’s disease. The research was published in The American Journal of Public Health.drinking tea may cut risk of cognitive decline

For their study, lead investigator Feng Lei from the Department of Psychological Medicine at National University of Singapore’s (NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and colleagues analyzed data from 957 Chinese adults aged 55 and older. The scientists collected information about tea consumption of the participant between 2003 and 2005. They recorded how much tea the participants drank, how often and what type of tea they drank.

Having analyzed the collected data, the researchers concluded that those who consumed tea on a daily basis had 50% lower risk of cognitive decline, compared to those who drank tea seldom.

Incoherent and Non-specific Speech Can Be the First Sign of Mental Decline

According to a new study, a rambling and non-specific speech might be the early sign of the coming mental decline – Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. Researchers managed to find evidence that people with mild cognitive impairment are more likely to use more words than necessary and they usually need more time to find the right words compared to their healthy counterparts.mental decline

For the study, the researchers compared the language abilities of 22 healthy young persons, 24 senior persons, and 22 people with MCI. Patients with MCI gave long and redundant with their answers to simple questions.

Lead researcher Janet Cohen Sherman from Massachusetts General Hospital explains: “They were much less concise in conveying information, the sentences they produced were much longer, they had a hard time staying on point and I guess you could say they were much more roundabout in getting their point across.”

Age-related Cognitive Decline in Women May Start in Midlife

A new research suggests that age-related cognitive decline may start in women earlier than scientists previously believed. A team of researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, wanted to examine the given evidence on cognitive decline in women.Age-related Cognitive Decline in Women

For their study, the scientists collected data on the cognitive abilities of 2,709 healthy women from 42 to 52 years old. They analysed the results of 7,185 cognition tests with an average follow-up period of 6 years and 6 months. The study concluded that in general, during the 10-year period the women’s cognitive abilities deteriorated by an average 4.9%.

The authors of the study say: “This study provides good new evidence of cognitive aging in women in midlife, with significant longitudinal declines in both processing speed and verbal memory. Unlike previous longitudinal studies in midlife that were based on 3 or fewer cognition assessments, and could not adequately account for practice effects, we analyzed up to 6 annual or biennial assessments, allowing us to minimize the impact of practice effects and unmask declines.”

More information about this study is here.