Better Heart Health Associated with Lower Risk of Dementia

According to a French study, recently published in JAMA, senior people with better heart health have the lower risk of developing dementia and cognitive decline.better heart health linked to lower risk of dementia

For the study, the researchers followed 6,626 people aged 65 years and over for 8.5 years on average. The followed people lived in Bordeaux, Dijon, and Montpellier (France). The average age was 73.7 years. None of the followed had dementia or cardiovascular disease.

The researchers conclude in their study: “These findings may support the promotion of cardiovascular health to prevent risk factors associated with cognitive decline and dementia.”

To maintain good cardiovascular health, you should comply with the following recommendations: give up smoking; be physically active; include vegetables, fruit, and fish into your diet; keep your weight healthy; keep an eye on your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar.

Sociability in Old Age May Protect against Cognitive Decline

A new study from Ohio State University, US, suggests that sociability, especially later in life, may bring many mental and physical health benefits — it can protect against cognitive decline.sociability protects seniors from cognitive decline

For their research, the scientists included mice aged 15–18 months. As a part of an experiment, they were divided into two groups. One group was housed in pairs modeling “an old couple”. The other mice were placed into groups containing 6 rodents. They were given the conditions modeling housing condition for 3 months.

Having analyzed the received results, the scientists concluded that mice that were living in a group were better in remembering new locations and new things.

The researchers insist that it is important for people to make decisions about choosing a place to live when they get older, as these choices could either facilitate social activities or prevent individuals from maintaining a rich social life.

Cheap Drugs May Help Prevent Dementia after a Stroke

A new research from the University of Edinburgh, UK, suggests that cheap cilostazol tablets may reduce damage to arteries, which lead to blood clots, resulting in strokes and cognitive decline.cheap drugs may reduce risk of dementia

The researchers plan to assess the medications’ ability to cut the risk of lacunar strokes and dementia within the next three years.

Dr. Doug Brown from the Alzheimer’s Society says: “With no new dementia drug in 15 years – but one person every three minutes developing it – the race is on to find desperately needed drugs that can prevent people getting dementia. Finding an existing drug which can prevent dementia would be a huge breakthrough.”

More Evidence Found for Link between Sugar and Alzheimer’s Disease

A recent research suggests that people with high blood sugar experience worse long-term cognitive decline compared to their peers with the normal level of blood sugar.sugar linked to Alzherimers

For their study, a team of researchers tracked 5,189 participants, including 55% women, whose average age was 66 years. They analyzed their level of cognitive function between 2004–2005 and 2014–2015. Over time, the scientists monitored levels of HbA1c, or glycated hemoglobin, a measure of blood sugar control.

The analysis of the received data showed that participants with greater levels of HbA1c experienced much higher rate of decline.

The researchers, led by epidemiologist Wuxiang Xie from Imperial College London, explain in their paper: “Our findings suggest that interventions that delay diabetes onset, as well as management strategies for blood sugar control, might help alleviate the progression of subsequent decline over the long-term.”

Drinking Tea May Ward Off Cognitive Decline in Senior Adults

Recently, the researchers discovered that drinking tea on a regular basis can more than halve the risk of cognitive decline in senior adults, especially in those with a genetic risk of the Alzheimer’s disease. The research was published in The American Journal of Public Health.drinking tea may cut risk of cognitive decline

For their study, lead investigator Feng Lei from the Department of Psychological Medicine at National University of Singapore’s (NUS Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and colleagues analyzed data from 957 Chinese adults aged 55 and older. The scientists collected information about tea consumption of the participant between 2003 and 2005. They recorded how much tea the participants drank, how often and what type of tea they drank.

Having analyzed the collected data, the researchers concluded that those who consumed tea on a daily basis had 50% lower risk of cognitive decline, compared to those who drank tea seldom.