High Doses of Vitamin D May Help in Fight against Colorectal Cancer

According to recent clinical research, with the results published in JAMA, high doses of vitamin D may prevent the growth of colorectal cancer in combination with chemotherapy.vitamin D fights colorectal cancer

During the study, the researchers observed that progression of the disease in patients who received a high dose of vitamin D during the study stopped for an average about 13 months, while the patients from the group that received a low dose of the vitamin delay in progression for approximately 11 months.

Senior author of the study Dr. Charles Fuchs, director of the Yale Cancer Center in New Haven, says: “The results of our trial suggest an improved outcome for patients who received vitamin D supplementation, and we look forward to launching a larger trial to confirm these exciting and provocative findings.”

Onion and Garlic May Prevent from Developing Colorectal Cancer

onions and garlic prevent from developing colorectal cancer

A recent study by First Hospital of China Medical University finds that different kinds of onions and garlic can protect us against developing colorectal cancer.

For the study, a team of researchers matched 833 individuals with colorectal cancer with 833 control participants without it, similar in age and sex and living in similar locations.

The scientists discovered that there was a significant relationship between the level of allium vegetables that an individual consumes and the risk of colorectal cancer. The analysis showed that in adults who consumed the highest levels of allium vegetables, the risk of colorectal cancer was 79% lower than in people who ate the lowest levels.

Senior study author Dr. Zhi Li comments: “It is worth noting that in our research there seems to be a trend: the greater the amount of allium vegetables, the better the protection.”

Excessive TV-watching May Raise the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Men

A new study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, reveals that men who used to binge-watch TV-shows may have the higher risk of developing colorectal cancer.binge TV-watching leads to colorectal cancer

For their study, a team of researchers analyzed data from UK Biobank, a health database of approximately 500,000 men and women in the United Kingdom. The scientists gathered data on how many hours each subject spent in sedentary activities such as TV-watching or using a computer daily.

Having analyzed the received results, the scientists concluded that men who watched TV at least 4 hours a day had a 35% greater risk of developing colorectal cancer than men who watched TV for 1 hour a day or less. Also, the researchers found that men who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity had 23% lower risk of developing colon cancer.

Fiber in Diet May Improve Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

A new study, published in JAMA Oncology, finds that higher fiber intake may help improve survival for patients in the early stages of colorectal cancer.improve survival

For the study, a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, US, included the data of 1,575 individuals who were part of the Nurses’ Health Study or the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Having analyzed the data, they found that every 5-gram increase in fiber per day was linked to a 22% reduction in colorectal cancer-specific mortality and a 14% reduction in all-cause mortality.

The scientists concluded in their study: “Higher intake of fiber and whole grains after a colorectal cancer diagnosis is associated with a lower rate of death from that disease and other causes. Our findings provide support for the nutritional recommendations of maintaining sufficient fiber intake among CRC survivors.”

Three Key Rules of Mediterranean Diet That Help Reduce the Risk of Cancer

A new study from Tel-Aviv Medical Center reveals that eating more fruit and fish, and drinking less fizzy drinks are the three key rules of the Mediterranean diet that can reduce the risk of developing pre-cancerous colorectal polyps by more than 30%.three key rules

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed the dietary questionnaires of 808 people aged between 40 and 70 undergoing screening or diagnostic colonoscopies.

Naomi Fiss Isakov, the author of the study, says: “We found that each one of these three choices was associated with a little more than 30% reduced odds of a person having an advanced, pre-cancerous colorectal lesion, compared to people who did not eat any of the MD components.”

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