Restless Legs Syndrome Increases Risk of Heart-Related Death

A new research, published in the journal Neurology, finds that the restless legs syndrome (RLS), the sleep and sensorimotor disorder, may increase the risk of heart-related death, especially in senior women.restless legs syndrome

For the study, a team of scientists examined data on 57,417 women from the Nurses’ Health Study. The women were clinically followed for a period of 10 years. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers concluded that over the 10-years period women with restless legs syndrome were 43% more likely to die from a heart disease.

The lead author of the research Xiang Gao, an associate professor of nutritional sciences at Pennsylvania State University in State College, says: “People with RLS are at elevated risk of CVD and other chronic conditions, but previous studies of all-cause mortality in people with RLS have reported inconsistent results. Our research clarifies how restless leg[s] syndrome affects cardiovascular disease-related mortality in older women, specifically. This study suggests that RLS could be a novel risk factor for CVD-related death.”

Senior People Leaving Home Daily Have Higher Chance to Live Longer

A new study, published in the journal of the American Geriatrics Society, suggests that older adults that leaving home every day have more chances to live longer compared to those who stay indoors.leaving home

The study included data of 3,375 adults aged between 70 and 90 years all of whom were involved in the 1990–2015 Jerusalem Longitudinal Study.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists found that senior adults who left their houses regularly were at the lowest risk of death, while those seniors who left their houses seldom were at the highest risk of death.

Dr. Jacobs says: “What is interesting is that the improved survival associated with getting out of the house frequently was also observed among people with low levels of physical activity, and even those with impaired mobility. Resilient individuals remain engaged, irrespective of their physical limitations.”

Having a Dog May Reduce Your Risk of All-Cause Death

According to a study, conducted by the scientists from Uppsala University, Sweden, dogs may considerably reduce our risk of premature death.dogs reduce the risk of all-cause death

For the study, a team of scientists analyzed the data received from more than 3.4 million adults and found that people in multi-person and single-person households who owned a dog had 11% and 33% lower risk of all-cause death respectively than those without dogs.

The researchers conclude in their study: “Taken together, we believe our longitudinal population-wide design provides the most robust evidence so far of a link between dog ownership and health outcomes, although bias from reverse causation, misclassification, and confounding cannot be excluded.”