Better Heart Health Associated with Lower Risk of Dementia

According to a French study, recently published in JAMA, senior people with better heart health have the lower risk of developing dementia and cognitive decline.better heart health linked to lower risk of dementia

For the study, the researchers followed 6,626 people aged 65 years and over for 8.5 years on average. The followed people lived in Bordeaux, Dijon, and Montpellier (France). The average age was 73.7 years. None of the followed had dementia or cardiovascular disease.

The researchers conclude in their study: “These findings may support the promotion of cardiovascular health to prevent risk factors associated with cognitive decline and dementia.”

To maintain good cardiovascular health, you should comply with the following recommendations: give up smoking; be physically active; include vegetables, fruit, and fish into your diet; keep your weight healthy; keep an eye on your blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar.

Scientists Explained Why Smells Revoke Vivid Memories

Our brain combines smell with the information about space and time to form episodic vivid memories, according to a recent research, published in the journal Nature Communications. These findings can help improve sniff tests for the Alzheimer’s disease.smells are associated with vivid memories

In the course of the study, a team of researchers examined the role of the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) in memory using a mouse model in a range of experiments. They discovered a previously unknown neural pathway between the hippocampus and the AON.

Study co-author Afif Aqrabawi says: “[The findings demonstrate] that we now understand which circuits in the brain govern the episodic memory for the smell. The circuit can now be used as a model to study fundamental aspects of human episodic memory and the other odor memory deficits seen in neurogenerative conditions.”

Sleep Apnea Connected to the Higher Risk of Dementia

A recent research, published in the European Respiratory Journal, finds that sleep apnea, a common disorder that interferes with the breathing while sleeping, is connected to the changes in brain structure similar to changes seen in early dementia.sleep apnea increases the risk of dementia

For the study, 83 participants were involved with the age from 51 to 88. They reported memory and mood problems to their doctors. None of them was diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) They underwent memory tests and MRI brain scans.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists concluded that a low level of oxygen in blood during sleep was associated with the loss of thickness of the right and left temporal lobes of the brain. These brain structures play important role in memory processes and proved to be changed in dementia.

More information about Sleep Apnea and its symptoms you may find here.

Cheap Drugs May Help Prevent Dementia after a Stroke

A new research from the University of Edinburgh, UK, suggests that cheap cilostazol tablets may reduce damage to arteries, which lead to blood clots, resulting in strokes and cognitive decline.cheap drugs may reduce risk of dementia

The researchers plan to assess the medications’ ability to cut the risk of lacunar strokes and dementia within the next three years.

Dr. Doug Brown from the Alzheimer’s Society says: “With no new dementia drug in 15 years – but one person every three minutes developing it – the race is on to find desperately needed drugs that can prevent people getting dementia. Finding an existing drug which can prevent dementia would be a huge breakthrough.”

Eating Vegetables, Fruit, and Fish May Keep Your Brain Sharp

A new study finds that brain volumes of people who regularly eat vegetables, fruit, and fish are on average 2ml greater than brain volumes of those who often drink sugary beverages. A brain volume reduction of 3.6ml equals to one year of aging.vegetables keep your brain sharp

For the study, the researchers from Erasmus University, Rotterdam, analyzed diets of 4,213 adults with an average age of 66 who didn’t have dementia. The participants also had to take scans to determine their brain volumes.

Dr Meike Vernooij, the author of the study, says: “People with greater brain volume have been shown in other studies to have better cognitive abilities, so initiatives that help improve diet quality may be a good strategy to maintain thinking skills in older adults.”