Drinking Four Glasses of Wine a Week Can Raise the Risk of Dementia

A new study, conducted by researchers from King’s College London, suggests that drinking just four pints of beer or small glasses of wine a week increases the risk of developing dementia.Drinking Four Glasses of Wine a Week Can Raise the Risk of Dementia

For their research, a team of scientists analyzed data on over 15,000 people aged 50 and over and tracked them for 2 subsequent years. They examined the levels of alcohol they consumed, as well as quantity and frequency. Specialized tests were used to measure thinking skills.

Dr. Tony Rao, a consultant psychiatrist who led the study at King’s College London, says: “With a career of more than 20 years devoted to research on alcohol and older people, this is certainly the most groundbreaking study on the relationship between drinking and the risk of dementia. None of the participants had dementia at the start of the study but those who drank at risky levels were more likely to show a cognitive decline, which is likely to progress to dementia.”

Coffee and Tea May Reduce Rates of Stroke and Dementia

Drinking coffee or tea may be associated with a lower risk of stroke and dementia, according to a recent study published in the journal PLOS Medicine. Drinking coffee was also associated with a reduced risk of post-stroke dementia.Coffee and Tea May Reduce Rates of Stroke and Dementia

A team of researchers, led by Yuan Zhang, from Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China studied data on 365,682 participants from the UK Biobank, recruited in2006-2010 and followed until 2020. At the outset, participants reported their coffee and tea intake. Over the study period, 5,079 participants developed dementia, and 10,053 had at least one stroke.

The analysis of the collected data showed that individuals who drank 2-3 cups of coffee or 3-5 cups of tea per day, or a combination of 4-6 cups of coffee and tea, had the lowest incidence of stroke or dementia.

Those who drank 2-3 cups of coffee and 2-3 cups of tea daily had a 32% lower risk of stroke and a 28% lower risk of dementia compared with those who didn’t drink any of these beverages at all. Consumption of coffee alone or in combination with tea was also associated with a lower risk of post-stroke dementia.

Highly Inflammatory Diets Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia

In a new study, researchers of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece found that individuals eating highly inflammatory diets were more than three times more likely to develop dementia compared to those who eat anti-inflammatory diets.Researchers found that individuals eating highly inflammatory diets were more than three times more likely to develop dementia.

For their study, the scientists recruited 1,059 individuals. None of the participants had dementia at their first evaluation, and they all had to provide dietary information on the main food groups they had consumed within the past month.

Among the 1,059 individuals the researchers included in the analyses, 62 developed dementia during the follow-up period, which continued for 3 years. The analysis showed that people who ate the most inflammatory diets were 3.43 times more likely to develop dementia than those who ate the least inflammatory diets.

Study: Simple Diet May Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease

In a new long-term study, researchers from Rush University in Illinois found that such a simple diet as the MIND diet can change the cognitive resilience to dementia in the future.Study Simple Diet May Protect Against Alzheimer's Disease

The MIND diet is based on the Mediterranean diet and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet and was developed by nutritional epidemiologists at the mentioned university.

For this study, a team of scientists analyzed data on 569 participants who had died during a long-term study started in 1997, called the Memory and Aging Project. All participants agreed to undergo yearly clinical evaluations while they were alive, and an autopsy after death.

Geriatric health researcher Klodian Dhana from Rush Medical College says: “Some people have enough plaques and tangles in their brains to have a postmortem diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, but they do not develop clinical dementia in their lifetime. Some have the ability to maintain cognitive function despite the accumulation of these pathologies in the brain, and our study suggests that the MIND diet is associated with better cognitive functions independently of brain pathologies related to Alzheimer’s disease.”

Depression in Early Adulthood Increases the Risk of Developing Dementia

A new study, conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, suggests that people suffering from depression in early adulthood have a higher risk to develop dementia later in life.Depression in Early Adulthood Increases the Risk of Developing Dementia

For the study, the researchers analyzed data received from more than 15,000 participants, aged between 20 and 89, who were at different stages of their life. The analysis showed that individuals who had symptoms of depression in their 20s had an almost 75% higher risk to experience full cognitive decline when they become old.

Lead study author Dr. Willa Brenowitz, from the UCSF Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, says: “Generally, we found that the greater the depressive symptoms, the lower the cognition and the faster the rates of decline. Older adults estimated to have moderate or high depressive symptoms in early adulthood were found to experience a drop in cognition over 10 years.”

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