Gut Bacteria May Help Doctors in Diagnostics of Diabetes

According to a new study, conducted by a team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich, Germany, gut bacteria patterns may help doctors to diagnose diabetes.Gut Bacteria May Help Doctors in Diagnostics of Diabetes

The team analyzed the microbiomes of approximately 2,000 people within 24 hours and their results confirmed the regular oscillations of gut bacteria. They found that people with obesity and type 2 diabetes lost the rhythmic patterns of their gut bacteria.

Co-author of the study Silke Kiessling, co-author of the study says: “When certain gut bacteria do not follow a day-night rhythm, so if their number and function does not change over the course of the day, this can be an indicator for [type 2 diabetes].”

Optimism May Protect Postmenopausal Women against Diabetes

optimism in postmenopausal women

A new study from the School of Public Health at Indiana University in Bloomington, US, suggests that optimism may protect postmenopausal women against type 2 diabetes.

The team of scientists discovered that the most optimistic women were 12% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women with the lowest quartile of optimism. Scientists also concluded that low optimism and high negativity linked to the higher risk of incident diabetes in postmenopausal women.

Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, the executive director of the journal Menopause, where the results of the research were published, comments: “In addition to efforts to promote healthy behaviors, women’s personality traits should be considered to guide clinical or programmatic intervention strategies in diabetes prevention.”

Early Breakfast Linked to a Lower BMI among People with Type 2 Diabetes

According to a research from the University of Illinois in Chicago, people with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes who wake up late and have their breakfast late are more likely to have higher body mass indices (BMI) compared to those who wake up early and have early breakfast.early breakfast

To study this phenomenon, the scientists recruited 210 non-shift workers living in Thailand with Type 2 diabetes. Their preferences were studied with the help of a questionnaire that focused on time for waking up and going to bed, time of day spent exercising and time of day engaged in a mental activity.

Lead researcher Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, says: “Later breakfast time is a novel risk factor associated with a higher BMI among people with Type 2 diabetes. It remains to be investigated if eating breakfast earlier will help with body weight in this population.”

Coconut Oil Can Reduce the Risk of Developing Heart Disease

A new research from the University of Cambridge suggests that eating coconut daily may lower the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.coconut oil

For the study, a team of researchers used data of 94 volunteers aged between 50 and 75 none of whom had diabetes or heart disease. All the participants were divided into 3 groups, where one group consumed coconut oil, the second group consumed extra virgin olive oil, and the third group consumed unsalted butter every day for 4 weeks.

The results of the study showed that those participants who ate coconut oil demonstrated the biggest rise in HDL cholesterol levels, 15% on average.

Artificial Sweeteners May Raise Risk of Diabetes in 2 Weeks

A new study, presented at a conference in Lisbon, finds that using artificial sweeteners instead of regular sugar could raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.artificial sweeteners

The research included 27 healthy people who were either given sweeteners, the equivalent of 1.5 liters of diet drink, or an inactive placebo. At the end of two weeks, the tests showed that those supplements saw a heightened response across all analyses.

Lead author Prof Richard Young said: “This study supports the concept that artificial sweeteners could reduce the body’s control of blood sugar levels and highlights the potential for exaggerated post-meal glucose levels in high habitual NAS [non-caloric artificial sweeteners] users, which could predispose them to develop type 2 diabetes.”

MediGoo - Health Medical Tests and Free Health Medical Information