Early Breakfast Linked to a Lower BMI among People with Type 2 Diabetes

According to a research from the University of Illinois in Chicago, people with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes who wake up late and have their breakfast late are more likely to have higher body mass indices (BMI) compared to those who wake up early and have early breakfast.early breakfast

To study this phenomenon, the scientists recruited 210 non-shift workers living in Thailand with Type 2 diabetes. Their preferences were studied with the help of a questionnaire that focused on time for waking up and going to bed, time of day spent exercising and time of day engaged in a mental activity.

Lead researcher Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, says: “Later breakfast time is a novel risk factor associated with a higher BMI among people with Type 2 diabetes. It remains to be investigated if eating breakfast earlier will help with body weight in this population.”

Coconut Oil Can Reduce the Risk of Developing Heart Disease

A new research from the University of Cambridge suggests that eating coconut daily may lower the risk of developing heart disease and stroke.coconut oil

For the study, a team of researchers used data of 94 volunteers aged between 50 and 75 none of whom had diabetes or heart disease. All the participants were divided into 3 groups, where one group consumed coconut oil, the second group consumed extra virgin olive oil, and the third group consumed unsalted butter every day for 4 weeks.

The results of the study showed that those participants who ate coconut oil demonstrated the biggest rise in HDL cholesterol levels, 15% on average.

Artificial Sweeteners May Raise Risk of Diabetes in 2 Weeks

A new study, presented at a conference in Lisbon, finds that using artificial sweeteners instead of regular sugar could raise the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.artificial sweeteners

The research included 27 healthy people who were either given sweeteners, the equivalent of 1.5 liters of diet drink, or an inactive placebo. At the end of two weeks, the tests showed that those supplements saw a heightened response across all analyses.

Lead author Prof Richard Young said: “This study supports the concept that artificial sweeteners could reduce the body’s control of blood sugar levels and highlights the potential for exaggerated post-meal glucose levels in high habitual NAS [non-caloric artificial sweeteners] users, which could predispose them to develop type 2 diabetes.”

Low-Gluten Diet Linked to the Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new research, presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle 2017 Scientific Sessions, suggests that eating a low-gluten diet may increase the chances of getting type 2 diabetes.low-gluten diet

For the study, the team evaluated the gluten consumption of nearly 200,000 individuals in three long-term studies. Having analyzed the collected data, the scientists concluded that participants who had the highest gluten intake, up to 12g a day, had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes over the 30-year period. This is connected to the fact that cereals contain fiber, which is known to protect against type 2 diabetes.

Geng Zong, one of the study’s authors and a researcher in the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public School in Boston, says: “People without celiac disease may reconsider limiting their gluten intake for chronic disease prevention, especially for diabetes.”

Fingerprint Technology Can Help to Diagnose Diabetes

The first years of the twentieth century are marked by a breakthrough in criminalistics – beginning to use fingerprints to identify the criminals. Only 100 years later, it turned out that fingerprinting is able to detect people with a tendency to diabetes.
It is possible that soon, diagnostic laboratories of clinics and hospitals will have electronic devices for fingerprint scanning of patients. Using this method, well known to all lovers of police detectives, doctors can proactively identify people with an increased tendency to develop diabetes type 2.

It is known that any disease is easier to prevent than to cure – that’s why many of those who will be promptly referred to the risk, can avoid developing diabetes by simple lifestyle changes.

All this will be possible thanks to the discovery, which made by American scientists from Ohio University.

They found that people with asymmetry fingerprint matching on both hands (eg, index fingers of the left and right hand), the risk of developing diabetes type 2 are positively correlated with the degree of such asymmetry.

The same group of scientists has developed a highly accurate method for determining the asymmetry of papillary patterns on the fingers using a mathematical method called wavelet analysis data.

Checking the effectiveness of fingerprinting to identify persons at high risk of developing diabetes was carried out with the participation of 340 people, 200 participants of them had previously been diagnosed with diabetes.

The authors believe that determination of the increased risk of developing this disease can even be possible by comparing fingerprints of newborn fingers.

Now scientists from Ohio carrying out a new phase of the study, during which they will try to determine whether this method is applicable for the detection of an increased risk of type 1 diabetes.