“Night Owls” with Prediabetes Have Higher Chances to Gain Weight

A new study finds that people with prediabetes who prefer evening activities and go to bed late have higher chances to gain weight than early risers with the same condition.night owl with prediabetes have higher chances to gain weight

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine examined 2,133 people with prediabetes aged 64 years on average. Scientists assessed their preferences for going to bed late and waking up early, respectively.

Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, an associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism, says: “Timing and duration of sleep are potentially modifiable […] People can have more regular bedtimes and aim to have more sleep, which may help reduce BMI and the potential development of diabetes in this high-risk group.”

Air Pollution Might Increase the Risk of Developing Diabetes

A new study from the US suggests that poor air quality and diabetes are closely connected. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System in Missouri performed the study.air pollution increases the risk of diabetes

To achieve the set study goal, a team of researchers analyzed the influence of air pollution on a group of United States veterans with no previous history of diabetes. The followed the participants of the study for averagely 8.5 years.

Senior author of the study Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly says: “Our research shows a significant link between air pollution and diabetes globally. We found an increased risk, even at low levels of air pollution currently considered safe by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the WHO.”

Smoking and Diabetes May Promote Calcium Buildup in Brain

A new study from the Netherlands finds that smoking and diabetes are linked to the calcium buildup in the hippocampus, a part of the brain which is important for memory.smoking adds to developing of calcium buildup in brain

Within the tasks of the study, a team of scientists examined the multiplanar brain CT scans of approximately 2,000 people who attended a hospital memory clinic in the Netherlands between 2009 and 2015. The patients’ average age was 78, ranging from 45 to 96 years.

Having analyzed the received CT scans, the researchers concluded that 19% of the study participants had calcification in the hippocampus. Also, the older age, smoking, and diabetes were associated with the higher level of calcifications in the brain.

Lead study author Dr. Esther J. M. de Brouwer, from the Department of Geriatrics at the University Medical Center in Utrecht, says: “It is […] likely that smoking and diabetes are risk factors for hippocampal calcifications.”

Intermittent Fasting May Increase the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new study from Brazil suggests that trendy intermittent fasting may be the reason for increasing insulin levels and the amount of abdominal fat. It also may lead to the damage of pancreatic cells.intermittent fasting may increase the risk of diabetes

Intermittent fasting diet is a diet when a dieting person has “fast” days with a drastic restriction on calorie intake and “feast” days when one is allowed to eat anything.

For the study, a team of researchers placed healthy, adult rats on the diet for 3 months. During this period, scientists measured and monitored their insulin levels, function, body weight, and free radical levels.

At the end of the research, the rodents had lost weight according to expectations, but the distribution of their body fat changed unexpectedly — the amount of abdominal fat increased which is deeply associated with type 2 diabetes.

Early Breakfast Linked to a Lower BMI among People with Type 2 Diabetes

According to a research from the University of Illinois in Chicago, people with the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes who wake up late and have their breakfast late are more likely to have higher body mass indices (BMI) compared to those who wake up early and have early breakfast.early breakfast

To study this phenomenon, the scientists recruited 210 non-shift workers living in Thailand with Type 2 diabetes. Their preferences were studied with the help of a questionnaire that focused on time for waking up and going to bed, time of day spent exercising and time of day engaged in a mental activity.

Lead researcher Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, says: “Later breakfast time is a novel risk factor associated with a higher BMI among people with Type 2 diabetes. It remains to be investigated if eating breakfast earlier will help with body weight in this population.”