Strength Training Improves Blood Sugar Level in People with Diabetes

A new study from Brazilian scientists suggests that strength training may reduce liver fat and improve levels of blood sugar in people with obesity and diabetes.Strength Training Improves Blood Sugar Level in People with Diabetes

A team of researchers from the University of Campinas in São Paulo State, Brazil, conducted the study using a mouse model.

In the study, all mice were divided into three groups: the first group got a standard diet and sedentary lifestyle, the second one had a diet high in fat for 2 weeks and sedentary lifestyle, and the third group had the same diet as the second group but performed strength training sessions for 2 weeks.

The findings of the study showed that mice from the third group were still obese, yet their blood sugar levels significantly improved, and the mice from the groups that included sedentary lifestyle still had diabetes.

Optimism May Protect Postmenopausal Women against Diabetes

optimism in postmenopausal women

A new study from the School of Public Health at Indiana University in Bloomington, US, suggests that optimism may protect postmenopausal women against type 2 diabetes.

The team of scientists discovered that the most optimistic women were 12% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women with the lowest quartile of optimism. Scientists also concluded that low optimism and high negativity linked to the higher risk of incident diabetes in postmenopausal women.

Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, the executive director of the journal Menopause, where the results of the research were published, comments: “In addition to efforts to promote healthy behaviors, women’s personality traits should be considered to guide clinical or programmatic intervention strategies in diabetes prevention.”

Dairy Fats May Decrease the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

A new international study, led by researchers from the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, confirms evidence that dairy fats may decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes.dairy fats cut the risk of diabetes

For the study, a team of the researchers analyzed the data received from 16 prospective cohorts that included 63,682 participants from 12 countries. Having analyzed the data, the researchers discovered that people who consumed more dairy products had the lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

The lead researcher Dr. Fumiaki Iamamura says: “We hope that our findings and existing evidence about dairy fat will help inform future dietary recommendations for the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases.”

“Night Owls” with Prediabetes Have Higher Chances to Gain Weight

A new study finds that people with prediabetes who prefer evening activities and go to bed late have higher chances to gain weight than early risers with the same condition.night owl with prediabetes have higher chances to gain weight

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine examined 2,133 people with prediabetes aged 64 years on average. Scientists assessed their preferences for going to bed late and waking up early, respectively.

Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, an associate professor of endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism, says: “Timing and duration of sleep are potentially modifiable […] People can have more regular bedtimes and aim to have more sleep, which may help reduce BMI and the potential development of diabetes in this high-risk group.”

Air Pollution Might Increase the Risk of Developing Diabetes

A new study from the US suggests that poor air quality and diabetes are closely connected. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System in Missouri performed the study.air pollution increases the risk of diabetes

To achieve the set study goal, a team of researchers analyzed the influence of air pollution on a group of United States veterans with no previous history of diabetes. The followed the participants of the study for averagely 8.5 years.

Senior author of the study Dr. Ziyad Al-Aly says: “Our research shows a significant link between air pollution and diabetes globally. We found an increased risk, even at low levels of air pollution currently considered safe by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the WHO.”