Childhood Experiences Can Change Your DNA for the Rest of Life

A new research from Northwestern University, USA, suggests that experiences in childhood can influence DNA and alter it for the rest of human’s life.Childhood Experiences

A team of researchers analyzed over hundred genes associated with inflammation, looking for hints of epigenetic changes, changes that can be influenced by everything we do from how we sleep to how wealthy we are.

One of the more prominent forms of these epigenetic processes is methylation, one of nine of those genes was found to have a close relationship with a number of childhood variables including household socioeconomic status in childhood, extended absence of a parent in childhood, and even whether the person was born in the dry season.

In the future, this study could help explain the prevalence of cardiovascular and certain inflammatory diseases in specific communities.

Yoga and Meditation Can Alternate Gene Expression Changes Causing Stress

A new study finds that mind-body interventions, such as yoga and meditation, can reverse gene expression changes causing stress.yoga alternates gene expression

For the study, a team of researchers reviews 18 studies with 846 participants concerning effects of numerous mind-body practices, such as yoga, Tai Chi, meditation, and mindfulness, on gene expression.

Having analyzed the received data, the scientists discovered that people practicing mind-body practices have the reduced production of a molecule called nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB), which regulated gene expression.

Study leader Ivana Buric of the Centre for Psychology at Coventry University in the United Kingdom says: “Millions of people around the world already enjoy the health benefits of mind-body interventions like yoga or meditation, but what they perhaps don’t realize is that these benefits begin at a molecular level and can change the way our genetic code goes about its business.”

Scientists Identified 12 DNA Areas Responsible for the Age at which We Have the First Child

Researchers from the University of Oxford in cooperation with the Universities of Groningen, The Netherlands, and Uppsala, Sweden, have pinpointed 12 DNA areas that are associated with the age at which people usually have their first child and the total number of children during the life course.12 DNA areas

For their study, the scientists analyzed 62 databases that included information from 238,064 men and women for age at first birth, and almost 330,000 men and women for the number of children.

Previously, it was believed that the age at which we have the first child is connected to personal choices and social circumstances. But now this new research proves that genetic variations are responsible for this age.

Lead author Professor Melinda Mills, from the Department of Sociology and Nuffield College at the University of Oxford, says: “For the first time, we now know where to find the DNA areas linked to reproductive behaviour. For example, we found that women with DNA variants for postponing parenthood also have bits of DNA code associated with later onset of menstruation and later menopause.”

More information here.

California Nutrition Company Will Tell You What to Eat According to Your DNA

Over the past decades, experts have been working on developing different diets that increasing protein, eliminating fats, lowering calories. But very often the diets fail and are not so effective as was expected.

A new California-based start-up is trying to get to the root of this problem. They believe that the problem is that none of those diets focus on the dieter’s unique genetic makeup. Habit’s “personalized nutrition” program would analyze a person’s DNA to create an individualized food plan and deliver those ingredients to the user’s home. The company officially launches today, with its services beginning in early 2017.

A main purpose of each weight loss diet is to decrease the number of calories a person ingests. But the company’s research has shown that a main cause of failing of all diets is that the same foods can affect people in incredibly different ways–the same meal provides more calories for some and less for others. That’s why it is impossible to create universal diet that works for everyone. For this reason, many scientists are turning to the idea of personalized nutrition or nutrigenomics: Analyzing our DNA to figure out what foods will make us healthiest.

Read more at popsi.com.

Smoking Leaves Lasting Imprint on Human DNA

According to a new research, smoking cigarettes can leave a lasting imprint on DNA, altering more than 7,000 genes. This may lead to the development of smoking-related diseases.lasting imprint

Having analyzed blood samples taken from nearly 16,000 people in 16 previous studies, the scientists also found that in people who stopped smoking, most genes “recovered” within 5 years after they quit this unhealthy habit.

Dr. Stephanie London, a study author and a chief of the epidemiology branch of the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, says: “Although this emphasizes the long-term residual effects of smoking, the good news is the sooner you can stop smoking, the better off you are.”

More information here.