Cheap Drugs May Help Prevent Dementia after a Stroke

A new research from the University of Edinburgh, UK, suggests that cheap cilostazol tablets may reduce damage to arteries, which lead to blood clots, resulting in strokes and cognitive decline.cheap drugs may reduce risk of dementia

The researchers plan to assess the medications’ ability to cut the risk of lacunar strokes and dementia within the next three years.

Dr. Doug Brown from the Alzheimer’s Society says: “With no new dementia drug in 15 years – but one person every three minutes developing it – the race is on to find desperately needed drugs that can prevent people getting dementia. Finding an existing drug which can prevent dementia would be a huge breakthrough.”

A Compound Found in Beetroots May Help to treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Scientists from the University of South Florida in Tampa, USA, suggest that using betanin, a compound that gives dark red color to beetroots, can be used in future drugs to treat the Alzheimer’s disease.

To achieve their results, the team of researchers conducted a series of laboratoryexperiments during which they monitored the activity of amyloid beta in different context with the help of 3,5-Di-tert-butylcatechol (DTBC), a compound that allows the scientists to observe the process of oxidation.

Li-June Ming, one of the lead researchers of the study, says: “This is just a first step, but we hope that our findings will encourage other scientists to look for structures similar to betanin that could be used to synthesize drugs that could make life a bit easier for those who suffer from this disease.”

A New Vaccine Can Protect the Brain from Effects of Heroin and Opioids

At the present moment, a team of researchers from the US is developing a new vaccine that one day could make the brain immune to the influence of such drugs as heroin and the synthetic opioid fentanyl.new vaccine

Two weeks ago, the scientists presented their findings at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Washington DC.

Chemist Kim D. Janda from the Scripps Research Institute in California says: “There is an urgent need to discover effective medications to treat substance use disorders. Increasingly, drug users are turning to opioids and powerful synthetic versions of these drugs that can sometimes be as much as 100 times more potent than heroin. Moreover, many patients [are] receiving treatment relapse.”