7 Things You Should Know about Eczema

Eczema is a skin condition where some parts of skin become dry, inflamed and itchy. This can lead to excessive scratching and open sores.eczema

This condition mainly happens on hands, knees and elbows and symptoms may vary in different people. It also has a strong genetic link, so this disease can often run in families.

These are seven tips how to cope with eczema from Dr. Johanna Ward

  1. Resist the itch, as eczema is itchy in most cases no matter where it occurs on the body and although it may be tempting to scratch the affected skin, this should be avoided.
  2. Moisturize. Hydrating skin is a key thing when having the condition as dry skin will further exacerbate itching.
  3. Avoid excessive washing. A lot of washing worsen eczema as it dries the hands.
  4. Keep it cool. Heating can make symptoms worse, it aggravates the condition.
  5. Dress smart. Avoid fabrics that can irritate the condition (wool, nylon).
  6. Choose right food. Some foods, like milk and eggs may trigger eczema symptoms.

More information here.

Hard Tap Water May Cause Eczema in Babies

According to a new study from the United Kingdom, ‘hard’ mineral-laden tap water connected to the increased risk of eczema in babies. Eczema is a chronic skin condition marked by itchiness and rashes.tap water eczema

The study included 1,300 3-month old infants from different regions of Great Britain. In this study, researchers checked the water’s mineral content and chlorine levels in tap water. Scientists reported that babies who lived in the places with hard tap water were about 87% more likely to have eczema.

Lead author Dr. Carsten Flohr from the Institute of Dermatology at King’s College London says that their study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood.

The author also adds that this study wasn’t designed to establish a cause-and-effect relationship and further research is necessary to learn more about this link.

More details here.