Exercising Parents May Boost Children’s Intelligence

A new German study, published in the journal Cell Reports, suggests that parents may boost the intelligence of their offspring by exercising.exercising parents have more intelligent kids

The research, using a mice model, showed that active mice are more likely to have offspring with the higher ability to learn compared to mice whose movement was restricted. German researchers identified that “microRNA” molecules which were known to promote this neuron connectivity in the brain, as well as in the sperm, in response to exercise.

Study author Professor André Fischer from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Disease says: “Presumably, [miRNA212 and miRNA132] modify brain development in a very subtle manner improving the connection of neurons. This results in a cognitive advantage for the offspring.”

Top 7 Weight-Loss Strategies to Burn More Calories after Exercise

We all know how to burn calories by working out. But what about burning calories after you’ve finished exercising? You can boost post-exercise afterburn using just one of these seven weight-loss strategies, approved by health experts:Weight-Loss Strategies

  1. Prioritize bigger compound exercises like chest presses over isolation moves like biceps curls.
  2. Lift heavy weights as it spikes your afterburn.
  3. Do not skip high-intensity interval training. HIIT workouts offer an effective method to keep your body burning calories after you have cooled down.
  4. Take a metabolic resistant training. It challenges your muscle and anaerobic system.
  5. Monitor your heart rate during the workout.
  6. Increase the intensity and efficiency of a strength-training routine by performing two exercises back-to-back.
  7. Use heavier weights during the final two or three repetitions of the exercise.

Mid-life Exercising Can Boost Your Brain Health, Study

A new research, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, suggests that a new exercise regimen, including aerobic and resistance training, can boost your brain health if you are over 50.exercise boosts brain health

For the study, a team of researchers reviewed 39 studies looking at the impact of such aerobic exercises as walking, running, and swimming, on thinking, alertness, information processing, executing goals and memory skills.

Study lead author Joseph Northey, a doctoral candidate and teaching fellow at the University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise in Australia, explains: “When we combined the available data from [39 previous] studies, we were able to show that undertaking physical exercise was able to improve the brain function of people aged 50 and over.”

Exercising May Lower Chances of Severe Mobility Issues in Senior People

A team of researchers from American Geriatrics Society suggests that exercising may significantly lower the chances of severe mobility in senior adults. They believe that seniors who exercise have fewer difficulties with walking or climbing stairs.exercising lowers severe mobility

For their research, the scientists enrolled 1,635 adults aged between 70 and 89. All of them had higher than average risk for becoming physically disabled over some period. When the research started, the participants could walk nearly one-quarter of a mile without help. After that, they all were divided into two groups, first of which was encourages to a daily exercising, and the other group attended weekly workshops.

In the end of the study, the researchers registered that people in the exercising group had a lower level of severe mobility problems than their counterparts from the other group.

Leading Sedentary Life Connected to the Higher Risk of Developing Dementia

A new Canadian study suggests that leading a lazy lifestyle without exercising or active recreation connected to the higher risk of developing dementia, as people are genetically predisposed to this disease.sedentary lifestyle linked to developing dementia

In the study, the researchers analyzed data of more than 1,600 people aged 65 and older who led a sedentary life. And they seemed to have the same risk of developing the condition as they all carried the apolipoprotein E gene mutation. This gene is known to increase the risk of developing dementia.

Jennifer Heisz, the lead researcher and an assistant professor in the department of kinesiology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, says: “Being inactive may completely negate the protective effects of a healthy set of genes.” However Heisz  adds that how exercise may reduce the risk for dementia isn’t known at the present moment.