Poor Diet May Lead to Permanent Blindness — Case Study Reports

A new case study from the University of Bristol reports that poor diet of a young patient led him to blindness. The researchers who performed the examination of the case recommend considering nutritional optic neuropathy in patients with vision symptoms impossible to explain in combination with a poor diet.Poor Diet May Lead to Permanent Blindness — Case Study Reports

In this case, a teenage patient was a “fussy eater” with a normal body mass index and height and had no visible signs of malnutrition. He also didn’t take any medication. Tests showed low levels of vitamin B12. Starting from the secondary school, the patient ate a limited diet of chips. Crisps, white bread, and processed pork. By the time the doctors managed to diagnose his condition, the patient had become permanently blind.

Lead study author Dr. Denize Atan, Consultant Senior Lecturer in Ophthalmology at Bristol Medical School and Clinical Lead for Neuro-ophthalmology at Bristol Eye Hospital, comments: “Our vision has such an impact on the quality of life, education, employment, social interactions, and mental health. This case highlights the impact of diet on visual and physical health, and the fact that calorie intake and BMI are not reliable indicators of nutritional status.”

Eating Eggs Regularly May Protect from Age-Related Blindness

A new Australian study suggests that eating eggs regularly may protect seniors from age-related macular degeneration (AMD).eating eggs regularly may protect from age-related blindness

For the study, a team of researchers analyzed data from 3,654 people that were monitored for over 15 years. The analysis showed that those who ate 2 to 4 eggs a week had a 49% lower risk of developing AMD than those who ate less than 1 egg per week.

Bamini Gopinath, PhD, lead investigator and associate professor at the University of Sydney School of Medicine, comments: “The findings of this study are therefore important as they indicate a significant and independent association between the moderate consumption of eggs and lower risk of developing late AMD. However, there does appear to be a threshold to the benefit of egg consumption in relation to AMD risk as no added benefit was observed in those who consumed an average of one or more eggs per day.”

A Cup of Hot Tea Daily Can Cut the Risk of Glaucoma

According to a new study from the National Eye Institute, US, the risk of developing glaucoma, a common eye disease in senior people, was lower in those who drank hot tea on a daily basis.hot tea

A team of scientists analyzed data received from the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which included the medical data of nearly 10,000 people. Having analyzed the received data, the researchers discovered that the participant who drank hot tea every day had 74% lower risk of developing glaucoma.

However, the team concluded that further research is needed to establish the importance of these findings and whether hot tea consumption may play a role in the prevention of glaucoma.

Natural Protein May Help to Prevent Glaucoma, Australian Study

A team of researchers from Macquarie University, Australia, has found that a natural protein called neuropepsin plays a key role in retinal health but this protein is inactivated in glaucoma.natural protein prevents glaucoma

The researchers performed an analysis which demonstrated that neuropepsin is deactivated in response to oxidative stress that could be triggered by environmental factors like air pollution.

Lead author of the study Dr. Vivek from the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Macquarie University Gupta believes: “This long-term collaborative study has opened up a completely new line of investigation in glaucoma research that will lead to new treatment avenues for the disease.”

Mediterranean Diet and Coffee May Protect from Age-Related Eye Disease

A recent research finds that eating a Mediterranean diet and drinking coffee may lower the risk of developing age-related eye disease (age-related macular degeneration, or AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness.age-related eye disease

In the study, 883 people aged 55 and older participated in the study. The researchers assessed their diets with the help of questionnaires. 449 people had early stage of AMD and 434 didn’t have eye disease. Following Mediterranean diet was associated with a 35% lower risk of AMD.

Also, the researchers found that people who consumed high level of caffeine seemed to have a lower risk of AMD. Among those who consumed high levels of caffeine (around 78mg of coffee per day, or one shot of espresso), 54% did not have AMD and 45% had the disease.

More information here.