Fiber in Diet May Improve Survival in Patients with Colorectal Cancer

A new study, published in JAMA Oncology, finds that higher fiber intake may help improve survival for patients in the early stages of colorectal cancer.improve survival

For the study, a team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, US, included the data of 1,575 individuals who were part of the Nurses’ Health Study or the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. Having analyzed the data, they found that every 5-gram increase in fiber per day was linked to a 22% reduction in colorectal cancer-specific mortality and a 14% reduction in all-cause mortality.

The scientists concluded in their study: “Higher intake of fiber and whole grains after a colorectal cancer diagnosis is associated with a lower rate of death from that disease and other causes. Our findings provide support for the nutritional recommendations of maintaining sufficient fiber intake among CRC survivors.”

Fiber Can Reduce the Risk of Developing Osteoarthritis, Study

A new research, which was a collaborative effort of researchers from Tufts University in Boston, USA, and the University of Manchester, UK, demonstrates that diet rich in fiber may cut the risk of developing osteoarthritis.developing osteoarthritis

For the study, the researchers completed a meta-analysis of two long-term studies on the benefits of diets rich in fiber. The scientists found that the participants who consumed the most fiber had a 30% lower risk of osteoarthritis in OAI cohort, and 61% lower risk of OA in the Framingham cohort, compared with people who ate the least fiber.

Dr. Zhaoli Dai, a lead researcher of the study of the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, says: “Findings from two longitudinal studies consistently showed that higher total fiber intake was related to a lower risk of [symptomatic], while the relation to [incident radiographic OA] was unclear.”